Famous Poets’ Nature Poetry (5): Of Mice, Men and Rabbie Burns

Dedicated to all those who have been displaced, both human and animal, by land development, natural disasters, violence, or other trauma, a reblog of “To a Mouse” by Robert Burns.

Philosofishal by Carrie Tangenberg

In honor of my trip to Scotland, the harvest season, nature poetry, and Scottish National Poet Robert Burns, this post shares a few excerpts and a discussion of his famous poem “To a Mouse.”

See the end of the post for links to more information and the poem’s full text, as well as a list of earlier posts from this blog series onnature poetry by well-known poets.


To a Mouse
On Turning Her Up in Her Nest with the Plough, November, 1785

Wee, sleekit, cow'rin, tim'rous beastie,
O, what a panic's in thy breastie!
Thou need na start awa sae hasty,
               Wi' bickering brattle!
I wad be laith to rin an' chase thee,
               Wi' murd'ring pattle!

I'm truly sorry man's dominion
Has broken Nature's social union,
An' justifies that ill opinion
               Which makes thee startle
At me, thy poor earth-born companion,
               An' fellow-mortal!

Language.

The first thing…

View original post 2,352 more words

2 thoughts on “Famous Poets’ Nature Poetry (5): Of Mice, Men and Rabbie Burns

  1. Pingback: Famous Poets’ Nature Poetry, 6: Hugh MacDiarmid in Scots | Philosofishal

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