Backyard Brief: The Yellow Eye

Backyard Brief from shots taken March 14, 2017

As much as I pulled the trigger, this lone winter goldfinch graced only my closest third look with true color–which I then enhanced.

My Life had stood - a Loaded Gun -
by Emily Dickinson

My Life had stood - a Loaded Gun - 
In Corners - till a Day
The Owner passed - identified - 
And carried Me away - 

And now We roam in Sovereign Woods - 
And now We hunt the Doe - 
And every time I speak for Him 
The Mountains straight reply - 

IMG_0256_edited-goldfinch-1-sq

And do I smile, such cordial light
Upon the Valley glow -
It is as a Vesuvian face
Had let its pleasure through -

IMG_0259_edits-goldfinch-lks-dn

And when at Night - Our good Day done -
I guard My Master's Head - 
'Tis better than the Eider-Duck's
Deep Pillow - to have shared -

IMG_0260_edits-goldfinch-good-eye-centrd

To foe of His - I'm deadly foe - 
None stir the second time - 
On whom I lay a Yellow Eye - 
Or an emphatic Thumb -

IMG_0258_edits-goldfinch_auto-equalize_eye-visible

Though I than He - may longer live
He longer must - than I - 
For I have but the power to kill,
Without - the power to die -

IMG_0254_edits-goldfinch-yellow-eye-squared

Five-Phrase Fridays 2015

ICYMI: Here’s a round-up of all 19 Five-Phrase Fridays I posted in 2015. I’ll be adding the list to my blog’s Five-Phrase Fridays menu tab for reader convenience as well. Enjoy!

  1. Five-Phrase Friday (1) – hints of politics in poetry
  2. Five-Phrase Friday (2) – snippets (tippets?) of Emily Dickinson
  3. Five-Phrase Friday (3) – terms of endearment for my dog
  4. Five-Phrase Friday (4) – compound modifiers in action
  5. Five-Phrase Friday (5) – 1980s comedic cinema
  6. Five-Phrase Friday (6) – favorite Apples to Apples matchups
  7. Five-Phrase Friday (7) – funny, punny small-town slogans
  8. Five-Phrase Friday (8) – select lines from cherished poems
  9. Five-Phrase Friday (9) – Shakespeare-style insults
  10. Five-Phrase Friday (10) – Outlander‘s Frasers & Mackenzies
  11. Five-Phrase Friday (11) – Halloweenish rock band names
  12. Five-Phrase Friday (12) – phonetics of bird calls
  13. Five-Phrase Friday (13) – Emily Dickinson reprise
  14. Five-Phrase Friday (14) – depiction of a cycle of terrorism
  15. Five-Phrase Friday (15) – blessings I’m thankful for
  16. Five-Phrase Friday (16) – first and last lines from my NaNoWriMo novels
  17. Five-Phrase Friday (17) – best songs from a beloved Christmas album
  18. Five-Phrase Friday (18) – books on perfectionism (we shall overcome . . .)
  19. Five-Phrase Friday (19) – five pop culture lists of five great things

Five-Phrase Friday (13): Eerie Emily

On the 13th of the month! This week, I’m doubling back on the Emily Dickinson quotes and renewing a little Halloween spirit, if for no other reason than it’s far too soon to be stringing up Christmas lights (next-door neighbor! #LetTheTurkeyCool), and because it works. Dickinson had a knack for the morbid. See Five-Phrase Friday (2) for the first round featuring her unique turns of phrase.

1. "a tighter breathing and zero at the bone" 
               - from "A Narrow Fellow in the Grass"

2. "in horrid-hooting stanza"
               - from "I Like to See It Lap the Miles"

3. "a druidic difference"
               - from "Further in Summer Than the Birds"

4. "on whom I lay a yellow eye" 
               - from "My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun"

5. "I heard a fly buzz when I died"
               - from "I Heard a Fly Buzz When I Died"

Note the personification of the train in the title of 2, the subsequent line being “and lick the valleys up.” Metaphors also abound in Dickinson’s work. One of the more interesting ones is her equating of life and a loaded gun.

Until next week, enjoy resisting the holiday season!

Five-Phrase Friday (2): Dickinson

My first post in this series last Friday showcased choice phrases in English related to politics in poetry.

This week’s poetic snippets–it won’t always be poetry, I promise!–are all Emily Dickinson, master of the original, often odd turn of phrase in succinct poems bursting with meaning. Hers has been a major influence on my own poetry writing and reading. Enjoy!

1. "to comprehend a nectar"
       - from "Success is Counted Sweetest"

2. "cool concernless no"
       - from "A Clock Stopped"

3. "my tippet -- only tulle --" 
       - from "Because I Could Not Stop for Death"

4. "surrender soundless as dots -- on a disc of snow"
       - from "Safe in Their Alabaster Chambers"

5. "punctual as a star"
       - from "I Like to See It Lap the Miles"

Such examples are legion, so we’ll probably come back to Dickinson.

Happy Friday.