Morning Fog, Loch Long, Arrochar

The view after breakfast from the delightful Seabank B&B, a placid, misty sea loch and sleepy mountains. Loch Long meets the sea to the south through the Firth of Clyde, found west of Glasgow (with its River Clyde), and sits a stone’s throw west of Loch Lomond in the Trossachs National Park, Argyll & Bute, in the Southern Highlands of Scotland. Arrochar is a small town at the northern tip of the loch. The peak of Ben Arthur, also known as “the Cobbler,” is just visible on the left behind this nearest ridge.

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image by C.L. Tangenberg, September 22, 2016

Scotland Ventured, Scotland Gained

October 10, 2016

We’re back! Stay tuned for upcoming posts on things like driving stories, travel tips, restaurant, lodging and attraction reviews, Outlander tour ideas, whiskey (whisky) sampling results, favorite close-ups and vistas, Gaelic language lessons, pleasant surprises, and oodles of images from two weeks spent exploring the land of Scots and so much more.

Alba gu brath!


November 2016 update: Posts of our Scotland excursion are linked below, through the far-right, top-menu tab “Scotland,” and on the Philosofishal home page.

Before the trip:

  1. Book Review: Fodors Travel Essential Great Britain
  2. The Labor of Learning to Set Limits
  3. Five-Phrase Friday (38): Scotland

After the trip:

  1. Morning Fog, Loch Long, Arrochar – snapshot from the Seabank B&B, Trossachs National Park (posted Oct 11, 2016)
  2. Scottish Color: A Photo Essay – overview of sensory highlights (posted Oct 12, 2016)
  3. The Paps of Jura – sea-and-mountains vista; language lesson (posted Oct 15, 2016)
  4. Linlithgow Palace, a.k.a. Wentworth Prison – profile of a lesser-known Outlander STARZ filming site (posted Oct 20, 2016)
  5. Famous Poets’ Nature Poetry, 5: Of Mice, Men and Rabbie Burns – reading “To a Mouse” & The Writers’ Museum (posted Oct 24, 2016)
  6. Kurdish in Edinburgh – restaurant review (posted Nov 4, 2016)
  7. Dial up the sun – original poem & photos from the National Museum of Scotland (posted Nov 9, 2016)
  8. An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 1 – my take on Outlander tourism, presenting filming sites in Central Scotland (posted December 1, 2016)
  9. An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 2 – continuing in Central Scotland with filming sites in Glasgow, then southward to the Ayrshire coast and Dumfries & Galloway (posted December 23, 2016)
  10. An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 3 – wrapping up orientation with sites in the Highlands, from Perthshire to Ross & Cromarty to Inverness (posted Feb 11, 2017)
  11. An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 4 – the story of my trip planning process, snapshots of planned vs. actual itinerary, summary of our experience, and reflections on improvements (posted March 11, 2017)
  12. Wildlife TV Programs This Week – a heads-up for Wild Scotland on NatGeoWild. See the end section about select Scotland nature and wildlife tourism options with brief descriptions and links to resources. (posted March 27, 2017)
  13. Review: Slainte Scotland Outlander Tour + Outlander Tourism Resources – (a.k.a. part 5) our Outlander tour and Slainte Scotland company review, notes on OL sites we visited alone, profiles of most popular OL filming sites, list of 40 OL filming sites, resources for OL book and inspiration sites, other OL tour company links, articles on the show, plus how to survive Droughtlander (posted April 11, 2017)
  14. An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 6, the final post in the OL tourism series, focused on Scottish and more general travel tips and resources, based on our Scotland trip experiences (posted June 15, 2017)

Updated June 2017 – lined-out items appear in “An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 6″:

  • B&B, hotel & transport reviews
  • travel apps I liked (& those I didn’t)
  • my whisky tasting report
  • Inverness dining delights

Celebrating Alba – candidates for what’s next:

  • Argyll with OL‘s Àdhamh Ó Broin
  • the Scotland driving experience
  • Cawdor Castle up close
  • Edinburgh down “close”
  • our Jacobite Steam Train ride
  • Sueno’s (Pictish) Stone, Forres
  • a great Edinburgh Castle visit
  • Tomnahurich Cemetery Hill, a fairy hill
  • monuments, museums, galleries
  • Moray Firth coastal exploring
  • vistas and secrets of Glen Coe
  • what not to miss at Stirling Castle
  • Fairy Glen on the Black Isle
  • National Museum of Scottish Football

On Process: Verse Writing, Part III: Home Stretch and Final Draft

On Part II

In my last post, I laid down a heavy, lengthy development process for your consideration. Now I feel giddy and light with the surety of being finished and knowing it truly has been worth the effort. In this post, I’ll reveal how that happened and share some of my favorite resulting lines of verse from my original elegy. It’s so exciting to be able to deliver on the promise! I’m relieved and a bit surprised, actually. . . .

Feel free to comment or tweet @Carrielt37.


The Verse Writing Process, Part III: Home Stretch and Final Draft

I have been through the wilderness and come out the other side refreshed, enlightened, and satisfied–about my poetry writing, that is. And let me assure you, this is an extremely rare feeling when I write poetry. While the drafting phase was somewhat cyclical and cumulative, toward its end, three distinct steps emerged: (1) final development/drafting and revision, (2) evaluation and final revision, and (3) “proofreading” or polish.

Final development/drafting and revision

At the beginning of this phase, which was after that 15+ step development period, I have to admit I was right in the thick of the woods, wondering how the heck I was going to find my way out.question-mark-maze-8643312This phase included a somewhat disorganized process of line scansion for meter, writing and rewriting to balance rhymes with language and ideas, adding ideas both in meter and disregarding it, plucking individual lines and isolated stanzas or series of stanzas from earlier drafts to place in the next iteration, and ultimately, leaving a ton of poetry behind. It was messy, but those discards may bear fruit elsewhere, some other time. It also took several days of wrestling with and ignoring the work, by turns.

In between sessions, I watched the film Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, which (spoiler alert) ends in Spock’s death, caught a glimpse of a tabloid headline targeting Nimoy’s demons, and read an article featuring synopses of the author’s top five favorite Spock-focused books. I allowed these experiences to inform and influence the poem’s development, adding ideas and reflecting on, and sometimes slightly altering, the ones I’d already put down.

Once the larger mess was behind me, I felt freer to re-order stanzas, sections, and lines within stanzas, and to revise content within and across stanzas. The poem began to take real shape.

Know_Your_Limitations_Then_DefyEvaluation and final revision

Although there were moments when the evaluation period seemed both self-congratulatory and extraneous, by the end, I felt thoroughly reassured of my poem’s finished status.

First, I assessed the progression of ideas after having done all that rearranging in the last step. Check. Then, I looked at how well the parts fit together as labeled with Roman numerals, reflecting the turning points in that progression. I moved the middle three numbers up or down one or two stanzas to improve the divisions.

Next, I gave final thought to the detailed poetic aspects: rhyme scheme, meter and rhythm, point of view between personal and universal, Spock and Leonard, topic focus and shifts therein, elegiac characteristics, other poetic devices, the alignment of content with form, the symmetry or circularity of the poem’s five-parted structure, and the effectiveness of repetition of concepts. Check, check, check, check, check! See Poetry Foundation’s Glossary Terms for more information about poetic devices.

There may be dozens of other little decisions I made more automatically based on my experience with writing and reading iambic tetrameter, studying sample elegies, and being an active poet and poetry reader for most of my life.

For some examples, I strove to avoid filler words that are empty of meaning–too many prepositions or articles–used alliteration, assonance, consonance, internal rhyme, near rhyme (end rhymes that are not exact, a.k.a. off rhyme or slant rhyme), what I hope are subtle puns, a formal tone with archaic word choice, a corresponding inversion of syntax (think Yoda speak) and interjections both to make rhymes work better more often, and rhetorical questions.

Decisions_arrows_sproutingSpecific to this poem were intentional placements of Spock sayings, physical and personality descriptions, multiple meanings for terms such as “dust,” “space,” and “soul,” veiled allusions to real life and other celebrities, and practice imitating the usual features of the elegy’s form and spirit. All of these decisions continued from early development through final polish.

Incidentally, I neglected to mention in my first post of this series the prep work I did, studying and taking notes on several famous, modern elegies by the likes of Auden, Gray, Yeats, and Housman.

And to fulfill the parameters of the original assignment from The Daily Post‘s free, online course Writing 201: Poetry, I made sure I added fog as a concept and metaphor as a device into my elegy.

“Proofreading” or polish

I put proofreading in quotes because I see finalizing my own verse as a very different process from helping students clean up a piece of prose. Every choice of punctuation, preposition, noun, and pronoun change in verse writing for me is fundamentally a poetic decision more so than a matter of correction.

Still, there are corrections to make, too, usually affecting the meaning of a line, or sentence across lines, toward more precise communication of my intended message, rather than fixing true grammar errors. This last step is usually brief and includes formatting my poem into columns.

The schedule?

My journey began on February 27th, the day Leonard Nimoy died, by writing thoughts and feelings on paper. The idea development step of the process took about 3-4 days. I first starting typing things up on March 2nd. Then, from March 7th, the drafting/poem development step took 4-5 days of actual work with days off in between. I spent between 1 and 3 hours for each sitting.

Due to my flexible schedule, I varied the time of day I worked. On a few occasions, I stayed up late, drawing my juice from my night-owl tendencies, starting work at 11:30 or midnight and working until 2 or 3 a.m. (I work as an online tutor part-time during afternoons, evenings, and weekends.) In my eagerness for results, I woke up very early for me the morning of March 16th to cross the finish line.

And what about those results?

The final product is a five-part elegy of a total of 29 four-line stanzas. Here are some of my favorite parts of the elegy I wrote in honor of Leonard Nimoy and his signature creation, Spock.

The first half of part III:

Where you once dwelt a single being--
two souls' two places, space and scene--
now mystifies the Star Trek fan,
bereft the hope you'd play again.

Let none suggest unjustified
the love of you, ironic pride,
for plain as scientific fact
reflects your greatness humbly back.

Who but you could teach us best,
less science, more about ourselves?
Who but Spock win skeptic minds 
and reaffirm all humankind?

Of man, of myth, of dual soul—
one resurrected, one immortal
—how can there be a final end
to he who was and shall be friend?

The final two stanzas of the poem, part V:

We clasp the artifacts of you
to fire our hearts and douse our blues.
Galactic space, your last frontier,
asks how you feel, O pioneer.

For you, we blest, stout hearted shall
declare, “Just fine,” return the call, 
as each horizon bears us forth,
to star-lit skies, our truest north.

? How do you decide when your poem is truly finished?

? When in poetry writing does one reach a point of diminishing returns?


In my last post of this series, On Process: Verse Writing, Part IV: Reflection, I will reflect on the process as a whole, sharing a summary of lessons learned, milestones reached, and impressions of the exercise of chronicling my verse writing process.

If you’re just joining me and would like to read about how this project began, go to On Process: Verse Writing, Introduction and Part I: Motivation and follow the bread crumbs from there.

I welcome your comments or tweets @Carrielt37.

On Process: Verse Writing, Part II: Developing an Idea, Trying a New Form

Last Time

In my last post, this series began about my poetry writing process and how it is evolving. Part I focused on my background and motivation; this post represents a key piece of the evolutionary puzzle. The discussion arose out of my attempt to complete an elegy assignment from a recent, free online course hosted by The Daily Post called Writing 201: Poetry.

Feel free to comment or tweet @Carrielt37.


The Verse Writing Process, Part II: Developing an Idea

Inspiration: Getting It Down and Getting Down to It

It turns out that I am also glad that I waited to tackle, for instance, Day Five’s assignment, an elegy related to fog using metaphor, until after hearing of Leonard Nimoy‘s death. Having such a meaningful, interesting, and personally impassioning subject present itself and align with the purpose of a task with a clear and fitting goal has brought new depth to my process.

A new approach to the writing of a substantial, formal poem has proven fruitful as a result, in the sense of ensuring (I hope) quality, cogency, and justice to the subject, in this case, the departed.

The approach constitutes my first real foray into any significant development of ideas and intentions before applying poetic form to the content. Aided by my determination not to stop writing and thinking until I was satisfied that I had said all that needed saying about Leonard Nimoy and Mr. Spock, I developed not just a poem but also the patience to do it with rich intention and to do it Aha_white_on_black_inside_lightbulbwell.

I have yet to learn whether the quality will fulfill its promise or whether this could serve as a formula to perpetuate, but I know with certainty that the experiment signals a new phase in my development as a poet. That realization alone is invigorating and encouraging.

Paradoxically, embracing the idea of development and the need for it has lifted, if just temporarily, the burden of perfectionism, which only ever becomes a block to progress. Patience replaces anxiety, and daily (or every other day’s) attention replaces the impulse do it all in one sitting.

These elements, along with years of experience, in turn have opened the valve to a freer flow of creativity. Faith in my skills and talent bring me to the next station, where I believe that this journey will end in more artful and satisfying results. I am the Little Engine That Could and Can. Although I know it will be difficult, I will do my best to leave judgment of quality and what the results indicate to the reader alone.

Development

With the goals of getting the content right, writing an elegy of some length, and making it a traditional type with rhyming couplets, four-line stanzas and other formal features, here’s what I did to apply The Daily Post‘s fog/elegy/metaphor assignment to create a tribute to Leonard Nimoy. Disclaimer: Remember, I’m not advocating a particular approach or duration of time spent, just sharing my own experimental steps. For the purpose of development, brainstorming through lists played a central role as I focused mainly on ideas first, then form.

  1. I started with a list of words associated with fog that I could write about, which I wrote before Nimoy died.

  2. After I learned of his passing, I made a new list of terms, phrases, ideas, and quotes that I associate with both him and Spock.

  3. Then, I copied the new combination of these two lists to bring together the most relevant concepts and appropriate pairings.

  4. Next, I wrote out lines of concepts and points I knew I wanted to make, seeking the essence of what I feel needs to be said from me personally and as a member of the American populace.

  5. I then researched and read about the Spock “canon” (a little), not having read any Star Trek books myself and harvested quotes on the Imdb.com database from select Star Trek movies.

  6. I drafted a rough, inconsistently metered and lined set of elegiac stanzas toward expressing poetically what would probably be easier said in prose. Patience is key in this phase.

  7. Afterwards, I highlighted the best of the lines, terms, quotes, and concepts to bring myself closer to the crux of what I wanted to focus on.

  8. In between some of these steps, I let things percolate, giving the subject more thought away from my notes. Here comes form. . . .

  9. I started over with a new poem that covered some of the conceptual territory I hadn’t quite hit upon in the first draft, focusing a bit more this time on form and wording.

  10. When I returned to the draft in the next sitting, I transferred it from paper to computer along with all the preceding lists and quotes. In the process, I added more poetic lines.

  11. I printed out the draft alone, without all the notes, and scanned it for lines that were really duds and ideas I decided against or facts that I mistook.

  12. I highlighted parts of the poem that I liked best, that felt most right, and also scanned the lines for meter and rhythm, isolating the parts that flowed more naturally than others.

  13. Upon reviewing the highlighted parts, I added lines for concepts I felt needed more, better, or different coverage or any coverage at all.

  14. With a few semi-intentional gaps between writing/assessing days for my poem, I began to lose some momentum, feeling inadequate to the task of writing an elegy about such a storied public figure and the American icon he created.

  15. Then, I pressed on to soul-search, seeking a way through.

The poem remained a work in progress when I first shared this post.


Phew! Lots of steps, right? So what do you think? Consider the above process and these questions in light of your own work:

? Do the above steps seem excessive or seem to constitute perfectionism? 

? Which steps seem most worthwhile? Which ones seem unnecessary? (Keep in mind that the elegy has a particular form with a set of guidelines to follow.) Perhaps some steps work well for some types of poems but not others?

? What steps do you go through and find most fruitful in writing poetry?

? What insights have you learned from other poets’ processes?


Want to know how it turned out? Me too! Tune in for the next post in the series, On Process: Verse Writing, Part III: Home Stretch and Final Draft, which will address the results of the development and drafting process, providing insight into the schedule I followed. Plus, I’ll discuss the journey of revision and reflect upon each phase undertaken so far.

If you’re just joining me and would like to read about how this project began, go to On Process: Verse Writing, Introduction and Part I: Motivation.

I welcome comments and tweets @Carrielt37.

On Process: Verse Writing. Introduction and Part I: Motivation

Introduction

For the next few posts, I’d like to share some of my recent discoveries, reflections, and experimental steps in my poetry writing process. My motives will become fully evident farther down the page.

Mainly, though, I heeded the principle I learned in teacher training that meta-cognition, or meta-writing—which is thinking about thinking, or writing about writing—would aid that process and improve my work. I know already that with a clearer, steadier process and better results, my motivation to keep working on my craft will also increase.

I hope you find this series insightful and enjoyable. I invite you to share your thoughts and resources throughout by commenting, reblogging, or tweeting me @Carrielt37.


The Verse Writing Process, Part I: Motivation

The impetus came from my participation in the free, online Writing 201: Poetry course through The Daily Post, for which I am extremely grateful.

For those of you not familiar with the course, here’s my brief description and evaluation:

  1. The prompts were good, and I think writing prompts are a generally useful tool.

  2. The presentation of the course, also good, involved each assignment addressing a new form, device, and topic.

  3. The pace for poetry writing posed an interesting challenge to me. I was able to keep up with the daily assignments at first, but I found unrealistic the expectation of daily production as difficulty and the accumulation of assignments increased.

I understand that it was meant to be a crash course that encourages plunging in without too much forethought and certainly little to no focus on editing, but after completing Day 3, an acrostic poem about trust using internal rhyme, I had trouble achieving lift-off.

Still, forward motion did and still does occur thanks to my attentive participation in the course.

My Poetry Writing Background

For me, poetic phrases come readily once the pen has been roaming the paper for a bit. However, bona fide poems of any length or complexity, good ones, take time, thought, revision, and sometimes research or re-reading of established poets’ work for inspiration and guidance.

I have been trying my hand at poetry since age 10, and even into my early 20’s I could find myself clinging to the childish expectation that the poem would be finished and polished upon first drafting. Well, perhaps it was more of a hope than an expectation, but either way it meant I put minimal effort into revision, though I didn’t always see it that way at the time.

Granted, part of the reason may have been because I did not know quite how to go about revising a poem. Only very recently have I realized that revision may not have been the issue at all.

My interest in poetry sprang more from a love of words, their sounds, and how they can fit together than it did from creating a coherent, cohesive message through the poem. I explored ideas and sounds, but exploration, rather than communication, was the main goal. At times, I ventured into nonsensical territory intentionally and with gusto. At others, I just couldn’t separate sense from nonsense.

I suppose this is a natural phase to experience as a poet, but I felt inadequate in my college verse writing class and understandably dejected when my entries into poetry contests brought no recognition. Then, not long after college, verse writing became a much less frequent activity.

A Helping Hand

Unless you’re especially talented or highly skilled from long-term schooling and disciplined practice, no creative undertaking begins its creation being good nor ends up great on the first pass, and for many writers, the same can be said about their long-term development. That’s what makes an engaged, supportive writing community so beneficial, and sometimes instrumental, to a writer’s development.

For this reason, I am grateful to have found the blogging world, WordPress.com, and The Daily Post, among other resources. It’s just not the same to read writer’s magazines or books about writing for motivation, momentum, or inspiration. The dusty stacks of writing periodicals strewn about my home and the rows of unread writing books on my bookcase attest to this truth for me.

Those do have their place, certainly, but the interaction of an online or in-person writing course, forum, or group adds a critical element of weight, relevance, and, most of all, energy to the work.

Although I have opted not to force a daily product from the Writing 201 course on poetry via The Daily Post, the initial feedback and opportunity to read others’ work have boosted my confidence and motivation as the daily assignments take on the more passive resource role. These feelings have made the prompts seem as interactive as they first were, and certainly as useful.

? If you participated in the course, what did you think of it?

? What resources help you in your poetry writing?

Please share any thoughts you may have about the poetry writing process.


In the next post, On Process: Verse Writing, Part II: Developing an Idea, Trying a New Form, I’ll discuss what inspired me to delve at last into Day Five’s assignment to write an elegy related to fog using metaphor, as well as the realization that development, not just revision, could be a vital missing piece for my usual poetry writing process.