Outlander STARZ: “Faith” and Patience

As anticipation of Season 3 of Outlander STARZ intensifies, allow me to quote myself from my last reblog of eps 201 and 202 review, published last month to coincide with the start of Season 2’s re-runs this summer:

The ensemble acting, Murtagh’s continued character development and greater centrality than in the books, the Battle of Prestonpans, the use of WWII flashbacks for Claire in “Je Suis Prest” (a great episode), and Rosie Day’s delightfully funny portrayal of Mary Hawkins are just a few of the many treasures to uncover. Then there’s Caitriona Balfe’s performance in ep207 . . . nothing short of phenomenal.

Keep watching Outlander, season 2, Fridays, 9pm EST, on STARZ. But I definitely recommend reading the books, too. 😉

In recent episodes, we’ve met “La Dame Blanche” and a resurrected ghost while “gang a-gley” the “Best-Laid Schemes” of our heroes. It’s time for the second half of Season 2 and some of the best episodes of the season: ep207 “Faith,” ep209 “Je Suis Prest,” ep210 “Prestonpans,” ep211 “Vengeance Is Mine,” ep212 “The Hail Mary,” and the season finale, ep213 “Dragonfly in Amber,” named for the second book on which Season 2 is based.

In ep208 “The Fox’s Lair,” Clive Russell brought excellence as Simon Fraser (“the Old Fox”), Lord Lovat, and Gary Lewis his usual nuance in reprising Colum Mackenzie. However, pacing, structure, and the Laoghaire element dragged it down just enough to remove the episode from top-tier classification. 

But there is plenty more to look forward to in the second half. Simon Callow’s return as the Duke of Sandringham and Lawrence Dobiesz’s performance as Alex Randall prove to be true highlights. Then, there are the intrigues of the war effort led by Bonnie Prince Charlie as Jamie tries to influence its course, some gruesome surgeries Claire must perform, a generally more resolute and strong leader in Jamie Fraser, the introduction of a young Lord John Gray (important to season 3), and several dramatic deaths that shake our main characters to their cores. A little “Faith” truly changes everything.

The season culminates in a 90-minute finale that introduces adult versions of Roger Mackenzie and Brianna Randall while interlacing 1968 scenes with those from 1746, on the morning of the Battle of Culloden.

In case you missed the announcement (what planet are you on, anyway?), Season 3 of Outlander, based on Voyager, Diana Gabaldon’s third and longest book in the series, premieres Sunday, September 10, 2017, on STARZ.

What better way, besides reading the books, to prepare for the return of the show this fall than to re-watch Season 2’s remaining episodes? See them all again through the Outlander STARZ episodes page, if you happened not to purchase the Season 2 DVD set or save the series on your DVR (tsk tsk).

Happy August, Sassenachs. The Droughtlander ends next month!

Claire-Frank-new-apartment-S3

Claire and Frank Randall, Boston, 1948. Season 3 image by STARZ/Sony Pictures Television

 

Outlander STARZ: Season 2 Review, Eps 201 and 202

Now that we’ve had the benefit of Outlander STARZ re-runs of ep201 and ep202, and if you’ve been following them, the re-blogs of my initial (and reaffirmed) reactions to Simon Callow’s work in ep202, here’s the re-blog of my more general review of episodes 201 and 202 as a set.

Upon re-reading the post, I stand by what I said last year. A key point to add: I had promised additional reviews of later episodes that I did not end up delivering. Although fun, intriguing, complex, and generally well acted and produced, season 2 of the Outlander STARZ series does glaringly neglect a faithful development of the fundamental core that is the extraordinary Claire-Jamie bond in the books. (And I’m not talking just about their sexual relationship, which is something many fans have pointed out as being insufficient in season 2.)

My growing disappointment in noticing this diminished spirit of the saga over the course of several episodes led to my choice not to risk dwelling too much on the negatives or unfairly discounting the positives of the show. So that’s why my reviews dropped off.

That said, I eventually (mostly) adjusted to this larger shift and found plenty to love in the 2nd series, and I think most show and book fans did as well. The ensemble acting, Murtagh’s continued character development and greater centrality than in the books, the Battle of Prestonpans, the use of WWII flashbacks for Claire in “Je Suis Prest” (a great episode), and Rosie Day’s delightfully funny portrayal of Mary Hawkins are just a few of the many treasures to uncover. Then there’s Caitriona Balfe’s performance in ep207 . . . nothing short of phenomenal.

Keep watching Outlander, season 2, Fridays, 9pm EST, on STARZ. But I definitely recommend reading the books, too. 😉

Even better news from Diana Gabaldon (the best source) recently indicated that S3 will be very faithful to the books.

Here’s my celebration of what’s to love and grieve about S2’s first two episodes.

Philosofishal

Highlights of Episodes 201 and 202

Spoilers imminent (but we’re mid-season, so it’s time to catch up anyway)

Sparkling Overall Performances:

  1. Caitriona Balfe as Claire
  2. Tobias Menzies as Frank
  3. Duncan LaCroix as Murtagh
  4. Andrew Gower as Bonnie Prince Charlie–quite the caricature
  5. (as always) Simon Callow as the Duke of Sandringham

Sparkling Moments of Performance:

  1. Sam Heughan as Jamie battling the Black Jack Randall demon in ep202
  2. Lionel Lingelser as Louis XV in ep202–so funny!

Delightful New Characters:

  1. Jared Fraser, Jamie’s cousin and a wine merchant, resident of Paris
  2. Prince Charles Stuart, presumptive heir to the British throne
  3. Louise de Rohan, Claire’s new friend and a marquess
  4. Mary Hawkins, Louise’s charge and teenager engaged to Le Vicomte Marigny
  5. Fergus, a young French pickpocket at first named Claudel, whom Jamie employs to steal letters to and from Prince Charles
  6. Suzette, Claire’s lady’s maid, an expanded role thanks to Murtagh’s expanded . …

View original post 1,707 more words

An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 6

Featured image: Three Sisters of Glen Coe. Credit: STARZ/Sony Pictures Television

So Let’s Review, Sassenach

Welcome back for this final installment in my comprehensive, now six-part series “An Outlander Tourist in Scotland.” We’ve had a hiatus from roughly monthly postings, which began in December 2016 with Part 1, proceeded through to Part 4 by mid-March, and left off in April 2017 with the muckle “Review: Slainte Scotland Outlander Tour + Outlander Tourism Resources,” in effect part 5. Thus, the numbering gap.

Between taking our trip and writing this series, I also published posts focusing on the aesthetics of the overall experience, certain mountain-sea and mountain-loch vistas, an Edinburgh restaurant we loved, a nature poem by beloved Scot, Robert Burns, and the singular, marvelous attraction of a well-preserved castle ruin. Then, between the first few posts in the Outlander tourism series and parts 5 and 6, I shared a timely heads-up to view nature programs like Wild Scotland in the post “Wildlife TV Programs This Week.” That post ends with resources for live Scotland wildlife and nature tourism.

Now I’m so excited to deliver, for this dedicated Outlander tourism series, a final set of experience-based tips, insights, and resources! Long-term project turns fait accompli. The series would not be whole without my top overseas travel tips, a survival guide, reviews of travel apps, insights on where we slept and ate (with photos), my list of touchstone regional Scotland websites, and some closing thoughts to tie it all together. I hope all six parts of this Outlander tourism series prove helpful and that you’re managing Droughtlander like a “sturdy” OL fan.

Disclaimer: My blog series content is based on a family trip to Scotland in September 2016. Remember to verify details to make your travel experience as smooth as possible, especially if you take the DIY approach. I share ideas to get you started, but info, resources, and site access can change or be incomplete. The UK and Scotland’s hospitality sector, including property owners and stewards of film sites, have the final say. Research and confirm with contacts directly in advance.

Top Five Tips for Travel Overseas

Now that you, the Outlander fan, know you really want to go to Scotland, and as you’ve started saving for the trip, it’s time (unless you already went!) to accomplish things that must be in place or in progress before your trip is imminent.

Next are my top tips for the U.S. traveler headed to Scotland, though the ideas apply to all travel abroad. Thoughts and resources for acting on the tips follow the list.

Incidentally, if you haven’t yet read Part 4 of this series, it will take you through our entire planning process, complete with itinerary snapshots comparing plans with actual results, plus reflections on the whole 14-day Scotland travel experience. Take a look!

#1 – The Passport: Before diving into specifics, take the most important step. If you don’t yet have a valid passport or are not sure it’s current, that’s business item number one. If your passport’s expiration date is too close to your dates of travel, even if it comes after them, your passport may not be accepted. Do your homework so you can pass.

#2 – Grab Your Guides: Be sure any travel guide book you consider buying includes some kind of survival guide section or street smarts feature. I’ll unpack the survival guide concept later in this post. Online government sites and articles can also be helpful on topics such as car insurance and car rental abroad (called “car hire” in the UK), travel insurance, rules of the UK road, and passport regulations.

#3 – Do I Really Have To? (Maybe Not): Save yourself some time and money by checking multiple sources before following advice that costs you both. For example, my husband and I discovered only upon arriving at our car hire office that we need not have paid for and gone through the trouble of obtaining international driver’s licenses. This may not be true of all car hire companies, so check before you travel.

#4 – The Travel Agent: Think about your tour priorities and unique circumstances so you can decide whether to go the DIY route or join a group tour for your entire trip. Enlisting the aid of a travel agent may be your best entree, especially for vacation packages. Do-it-yourselfers like me might appreciate the peace of mind of having the right travel agent on your side. I found it invaluable to ask questions and discuss ideas with my agent. He also booked our airfare and lodging package on our behalf, which saved us time, hassle, and money.

#5 – Secure Yourself: Don’t give issues of personal, digital, and overall travel security short shrift. Travel insurance may be a beneficial investment for you. With the right policy, you gain the freedom to focus on the fun, knowing you’re covered in case of X, Y, or Z unpleasantness. Buying Allianz travel insurance was affordable, convenient, and satisfying for us. I recommend Allianz without hesitation, but know your options, too.

Using Your Travel Guide

After you square away the passport, turn your attention to tip 2, the specifics of where you most want to go and what you most want to see and do during your trip. Get out those travel guides, take some notes, and chat it up. Again, see Part 4 under the sections “Where I Started” and “Scotland Guidebooks” for a list of print travel guides I used.

As I suggested previously, you can approach this either by exploring regional info sections of guidebooks or specialized websites, or by searching for certain activities, attractions, and tours, and then fitting those to time and place. The process should get you excited about travel planning and motivate you when the logistical slogging phase arrives—shortly. Here are some reminders of resources I shared earlier.

Along with the following guides, I’ve included a list of links to touchstone regional resources of Scotland. See the bottom section of this post for those regional starting points: “Appendix: Guides to Adventures in Cities and Regions.”

NOTE: Those are good regional starting points, but there’s a lot more where they came from, ready to be shared. Just say the word! Leave a comment or question, and I’ll get back to you with whatever I may have on the topic you raise.

Online Guides to Scotland

Along with specific resources for regions, areas, or individual sites (see the print travel guides or this post’s “Appendix”), it’s a great idea to orient yourself to the comprehensive websites for general Scotland tourism such as VisitScotland.com and Gazetteer for Scotland. Those were my go-to Internet sources for extensive place name lists, maps, and info (both), accurate historical and statistical profiles of regions and cities (Gazetteer), and up-to-date accommodation, attraction, and dining ideas (VisitScotland).

Try out a few of these broad-ranging web resources, and find one or two that you are most comfortable navigating and that consistently deliver the results you seek. Here are some possibilities. Blurbs are from the sources (parentheses mine).

Gazetteer for Scotland: Scottish Towns, Villages, Places, People, Families (scottish-places.info/scotgaz/scotland.html) – A vast encyclopedia of Scottish towns, villages, geographical features, historic sites, family names and famous people.

Gazetteer for Scotland: Map of Scotland (divided into searchable regions) 

Rough Guides – The Rough Guide to Scotland (roughguides.com/shop/rough-guide-scotland/) – The new, full-colour Rough Guide to Scotland is the definitive travel guide to this gem of a country. In-depth coverage of its burgeoning food scene, artistic innovations and awe-inspiring wild places. (for purchase)
Undiscovered Scotland: Home Page (undiscoveredscotland.co.uk) – The home page of Undiscovered Scotland, a combination of visitor guide, accommodation listing and business directory; aims to show you what the country is really like. (See also their Councils, Regions, and Counties page, which links to breakdowns of three different types of government divisions of land within the country.)

Scotland – The Guide to Scotland – Travel History and Places (scotland.org.uk/guide/)  Travel Scotland: Find the Freedom – Tells the story and inside info on places and history. Independent info about Scotland: travel, tours, accommodation, sightseeing, outdoor activities, castles, genealogy, etc, including the Highlands & Islands.

Scotland Travel Guide by Rick Steves (ricksteves.com/Europe/Scotland/) – Explore Scotland! Get inspired with Rick Steves’ recommended places to go and things to do, with tips, photos, videos, and travel information on Scotland.

Scotland Travel Guide | Fodor’s Travel (fodors.com/world/Europe/Scotland/) – Expert picks for your Scotland vacation, including hotels, restaurants, entertainment, shopping, top attractions, and more.

Fodor’s Scotland (Travel Guide): Fodor’s: 9781101879641: Amazon.com: Books – Fodor’s Scotland (Travel Guide) [Fodor’s] on Amazon.com. FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Scotland offers astonishing variety: its iconic lochs and mountains, as well as lively cities such as Edinburgh and Glasgow

Scotland Travel Guide | Travel + Leisure – (brief, 2 sections: Things Not to Miss in Scotland, When to Go to Scotland)

Scotland the Best: Peter Irvine chooses his top 50 Scottish places to eat, stay and play – Daily Record – THE latest edition of Scottish travel bible Scotland the Best is out and here, author Peter Irvine selects his top 50 places to eat, stay and play.

Nature Scotland – Welcome to Scotland’s forests – Forestry Commission Scotland (scotland.forestry.gov)

National Parks | Visit Britain (visitbritain.com)

Itinerary Design

Once you have an idea of your preferred main attractions, take a crack at designing your itinerary, matching your moves on the map with the slots in your schedule. Consider your budget, timing, and comfort needs during transit and overnight stays. Strive for a balance between seeing those most important highlights and sparing enough energy to enjoy the experience without coming home flat broke in the end. Below are some tools for making a detailed plan. Just remember, be flexible even after the fancy printout; life happens, and in Scotland so does the weather, even on vacation.

KAYAK.COM – (text mine) I thought their itinerary creation tool was the best and most secure among several I tried—all of those below. Create an account, login, go to Trips, add a trip, and enter your details!

Itinerary Design – How to Create the Perfect Itinerary | IndependentTraveler.com – What’s the secret to creating a great itinerary? Here are trip planning tips and essential Web sites to help you put together the perfect itinerary.

Itinerary Design – TripCase Travel App: Manage Itineraries, Trips & Flights – Connected to powerful technology & travel companies, TripCase delivers the right information at the right time to any device. Sign up for Free today!

Itinerary Design – TripIt – Travel Itinerary – Trip Planner – TripIt organizes your travel plans in one place. Finds alternative flights. Sends real-time alerts. Snags the best seat. We have something for every traveler.

Scotland Itineraries – Fodor’s | Scotland Travel Guide | Fodor’s Travel Guides – Find the perfect Scotland Itinerary for you! … created by the Fodor’s editors.

Reality Check: Travel Agents

Now that you have an exciting rough sketch of your awesome trip, it’s time to consider consulting a travel agent to disabuse you of any extremely unrealistic notions you may have developed by this time. Talk to an agent, or at least an outside party—a friend, online travel planning expert, relative, or just a person who’s been there before—to get some healthy perspective on your plan so far.

While you’re doing this, start getting some of those new questions answered that popped up during your perusal of the so-helpful-but-so-overwhelming travel guides. Ask the travel agent, who may help cut down research time and confusion-related stress. Note that this step combines tips #3 and #4 above.

The travel agent is a resource that, with a little forethought, can help in more ways than implied by the term “travel agent.” Ask about budget, financing, realistic timing, building in down time, ensuring time to eat, ways to streamline or increase the value of your experience, deals and packages, tour group options, and more.

By now, good travel agents should be aware of Outlander’s impact on Scottish tourism. They should have some idea of the rise in numbers of visits to Edinburgh, if not exactly why they’ve risen. If the agent’s missing the “why,” then you’ll have the chance, as I did, to educate them about the greatness that is the world of Outlander.

It’s natural for a U.S. travel agent to be most familiar with Caribbean and European river cruises, but good agents can guide you to wherever in the world you wish to go. At minimum, your travel agency should have some info ready on packages, cruises, guides, and in-depth resources for UK travel, if not Scotland travel. Ensure your agent can promptly pull up options beyond London. If they can’t, find another agent.

The best travel agent is a planning partner, adding value beyond flight/hotel discounts—without adding fees. We were glad to have this with Brian Chima at Chima Travel in Akron, Ohio. Note: I’ve never met Brian in person; we conducted all business by phone and email. So even if you’re not in northeast Ohio, Chima Travel may still be an option.

Traveler Protection

With safety and security, focus on a few key factors: insurance, personal security, and digital security. Decide how important your investment is to you because that’s what your trip is—an investment in enhancing your life with a one-of-a-kind experience.

You may find it worthwhile, at some level, to protect that investment with travel insurance. There are certain tried and true companies, as well as different levels of protection to purchase. It’s worth a little research and discussion with your travel partner(s) to familiarize yourselves with the options.

Below are travel insurance resources I consulted. Several proved insightful. We went with Allianz for travel insurance; it was a great choice insofar as we didn’t have to use the policy’s benefits. Cross your fingers, say your prayers, but protect yourself, too.

NOTE: Rental car insurance is a separate concern from overall travel insurance. We discovered our AllState auto coverage would not apply overseas. Unless we bought a separate policy, we wouldn’t be covered while driving in Scotland. So we added rental car insurance to our travel insurance policy at a reasonable daily rate. If we’d bought it with Alamo, costs would have risen. See the Car Hire/Rental section of the Survival Guide below for more information.

TripAdvisor: Inside Edinburgh, plus UK Comprehensive Guide – Before you see Edinburgh, see TripAdvisor for the latest info/advice, written for travelers by travelers.

9 Steps To Avoid Getting Scammed On Travel Insurance – Business Insider – Just before you buy your plane ticket…

Travel Insurance Coverage Tips by Rick Steves (ricksteves.com)

Travel Insurance db – Get A Travel Insurance Quote | Compare The Market – Compare travel insurance quotes from leading…providers at Compare the Market.

Travel Insurance Plan Comparison Chart – Travel Insured’s four Worldwide Trip Protector plans compared based on benefit levels and travel assistance services. Additional charts for medical, baggage, and reasons for trip cancellation.

Allianz – Purchase a Travel Insurance Policy – Step 1 | Allianz Global Assistance

Travel Insurance 101: How Travel Insurance Works | Allianz Global Assistance – More and more travelers are opting to buy travel insurance to provide benefits ranging from peace of mind to financial security.

BETiNS Travel Medical Insurance ,Trip, Holiday, Student, Cheap Travel Insurance – BETiNS – variety of Trip & Travel Insurance for Holiday, Student, Missionary, and Family Travel. Compare the best travel insurance and the cheapest travel insurance

Travel Guard – Cancel for Any Reason Travel Insurance Coverage (travelguard.com) – The Cancel for Any Reason (CFAR) option is available as an upgrade when you purchase the Platinum, Gold, My Travel Guard or Great Outdoors plan and is a great option that allows travelers to cancel their trip for any reason not otherwise covered in their base plan, provided they cancel their trip >48 hours before their departure date.

Ideas for personal and digital security, plus packing efficiency, can start here:

Best Gear for Travel | The Wirecutter – We put in another year and tens of thousands more miles of travel to test the best travel gear—and we stand by last year’s choices alongside a few new picks.

Packing Cubes & Folders – TravelSmith – Shop TravelSmith for packing cubes for travel and packing cubes for suitcases. Visit our site for how to use packing cubes and travel cubes and the best assortment of eagle creek packing cubes and packing sleeves.

Packing Cubes | Pack Smarter – eBags.com – Pack like a neat freak – even if you’re not one. Designed with efficiency in mind, packing cubes allow you to pack more while taking up less space. Shop now.

Although we didn’t go with packing cubes, I did buy some handy vacuum-less compression bags to pack clothes in to reduce their bulk.

It’s also a good idea to buy an RFID protective wallet, to protect your credit cards and passport from digital hacking. Ody and Tarriss both offer good product options.

Of course, be sure to keep updated on the latest airline and airport regulations for managing checked luggage and carry-on bags.

Survival Guide: Travel Logistics & Street Smarts

The following website collection covers a range of information on services for safe and legal travel, banking & currency, communications & media, state systems & practices, infrastructure, transport to & from, and navigation. Book guides should also advise travelers on health, city savvy, and any nation-specific nuances. Again, make sure some of your guide materials go into travel logistics and survival.

Keep in mind: This list represents our own interests during planning, plus specific services we engaged and investigated along the way. It’s not exhaustive, and obviously not everyone will need or want all resources. Consider it a sample starting point. For instance, because we used mass transit in Edinburgh and drove a rental car for more of Glasgow, I list the main Edinburgh bus system but not the Glasgow bus companies. However, we did enjoy touring with the hop-on, hop-off bus one day in metro Glasgow.

Blurb text for each listing is the organization’s unless otherwise noted.

Government

Scotland Government and Politics – Scotland Info Guide – History and present day of the Scottish Government and Parliament in Edinburgh

Parliament, Scottish – Official site with information on MSPs, history, buildings and current business.

Banking & Currency / Savings

XE: (GBP/USD) British Pound to US Dollar Rate (xe.com) – Calculate live US Dollar to British Pound foreign exchange rates with this free currency converter. You can convert currencies and precious metals with this currency calculator.

ATMs (Cash Machines) in Stirling, Central (travelmash.info)

Note: Our bank advised us to convert some of our dollars to pounds before flying so we wouldn’t be scrambling or delayed by trying to find a bank or fee-based machine between landing and taxi hire. Good advice.

HES Explorer Pass – Web Store :: Ticket Selection (tickets.historic-scotland.gov.uk)

National Trust Scotland – Join (nts.org.uk) – Join the Trust online today and save 10% when you pay by direct debit.

Communication & Media

AT&T International Calling Guide – ATPS-0120-LOAD.indd – intl-reference-guide.pdf

National Library of Scotland – The National Library of Scotland is Scotland’s largest library and the world centre for the study of Scotland and the Scots.

Transportation

This is a guide section often called “Getting There” and/or “Getting Around.”

Traveline Scotland, including the app available from iTunes and Google Play (a really handy resource throughout our trip).

Traveline Scotland – Public transport information – Timetables and journey planner for all bus, rail, coach, air and ferry services in Scotland. Open 24 hrs on 0871 200 22 33.
Edinburgh Airport maps (edinburghairport.com) (maps of parts of the airport)

Taxi Note: My husband and I found the Edinburgh International Airport taxi service (name unknown) to be very friendly and professional. Availability of taxis was sparse when we first arrived from baggage claim, so efficiency may be a question, but the stewards and driver were helpful and pleasant. The taxi was clean and comfortable.

Buses

UK Bus Checker – (text mine) For great help with buses in Edinburgh and Glasgow, a reliable service with a good interface is UK Bus Checker. It provides schedules and alerts for which bus stops are nearest your current location. UK Bus Checker displays live, up-to-the-minute countdowns when the next bus approaches that nearest stop. Maps show bus stops with pegs as on Google maps, and every stop between any two end points lists which bus lines use that stop. Live route maps let you trace where a bus will go on its route while you’re on it, and there’s also a journey planner tool.

Ticket options – Lothian Buses – Local Bus services in and around Edinburgh

Transport for Edinburgh – Android Apps on Google Play – Live departure times and journey planning for Lothian Buses and Edinburgh Trams.

Rail

ScotRail trains, tickets & service info in Scotland | ScotRail (scotrail.co.uk) – Buy cheap train tickets & find the best deals on rail fares to Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Inverness & the rest of Scotland. ScotRail is operated by Abellio.

ScotRail pass or no? Prebook everything? – United Kingdom Forum – TripAdvisor – Answer 1 of 7: May 14-21 in Scotland…

Rail pass – The Spirit of Scotland Travelpass | ScotRail – Find out more about ScotRail’s great value Spirit of Scotland Travelpass (formerly Freedom of Scotland Travelpass) for unlimited rail travel in Scotland.

There are also rail passes available from BritRail and ACP Rail.

West Coast Railways – West Coast Railways, Carnforth. Independent Train Operating Company – along some of the UKs most…

West Coast Railways is the company through which to book the Glenfinnan Viaduct trip between Fort William and Mallaig on the west coast, the viaduct being a site they used to film Harry Potter. The iconic transport is the Jacobite Steam Train. The Glenfinnan Monument, Glenfinnan, marks the spot where Bonnie Prince Charlie raised the Scottish standard to start the 1745 Jacobite Rising.

West Highland Rail Guides: One audio guide I found really fun to use during our West Coast Railways trip on 23rd September I found through the West Highland Lines version of the app called View from the Train: route “Fort William – Mallaig.” After you select among three available routes, a map pops up with the stops indicated. There you select the station you’re starting from. The journey begins with a well-performed audio tour accompanied by transcript text you can read as you go. Each page includes play button, transcript, and a picture of the area being discussed. It was a nice supplement, with different insights, to the brochures the rail company provided.

Auto/Private Vehicle

UK_speed_limits.png (highwaycodeuk.co.uk) (A good idea to review since few speed limits are posted en route; you’re simply expected to know based on the type of road you’re on – a tip from a fellow Outlander friend)

Streetmap – Maps and directions for the whole of Great Britain (streetmap.co.uk)

Car Travelling Around Scotland by Car | VisitScotland – Detailed information on Scotland’s road network, driving routes and car, campervan and motorhome hire, for your perfect driving holiday.

Car Travel in Scotland | Fodor’s Travel – Learn more about Car Travel when traveling to Scotland.

Route Planner | Maps, directions & route finder for UK & Europe | RAC – RAC Route Planner, Maps and Traffic News providing you with route finder driving directions for UK and European journeys at street map detail with a walking routes toggle.

Scotland Customized Map | Mapcustomizer.com (mapcustomizer.com/map/Scotland_Trip) (A snapshot of a group of 12 centrally located Outlander filming venues that I flagged and put together. This resource is not quite as sophisticated as the itinerary tools shared earlier, but it’s handy for a relatively quick sketch.)

Scotland Map and Distance Table (rampantscotland.com) Scotland Map & Distance Table

Scotland Distance Calculator, Driving Directions, Distance Between Cities, Distance Chart (UK) – (distancecalculator.globefeed.com) Scotland (UK) Distance Calculator and Driving Directions to calculate distance between any two cities, towns or villages in Scotland (UK) and Mileage Calculator, Distance Chart, Distance Map. May be also used for travel distance calculation for Scotland (UK).

Traffic Scotland (trafficscotland.org home) – Real time and future traffic information for Scotland, a service provided by Transport Scotland.

Also try: Traffic Scotland Radio (http://trafficscotland.org/trafficscotlandradio/) (for hands-free live traffic reports for the regions and the nation.)

Cashless mobile parking payment app – a better way to park | PayByPhone – Pay for parking easily with PayByphone – the smart cashless parking app that’ll help you avoid tickets & remind you when it’s time to go – download today.

Petrol Prices Live on Your Android phone | Whatgas.com – The following free Android application can be used to get live petrol pricing data straight to your Android phone…

Note: I used and liked the app Fuelio to search for gas/petrol and compare prices.

Car Hire/Rental

At least a few of these guides and articles are worth a look before you start shopping.

British Vehicle Rental and Leasing Association (BVRLA) car rental guide: Car hire – Your Guide to Renting a Car – from BVRLA – renting-a-car.pdf (bvrla.co.uk/)

Car Hire – How to Rent a Car in Scotland | USA Today (traveltips.usatoday.com) – Many international visitors to Scotland stick to the major cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow, but the majority of the country’s castles and large, historic houses are in rural areas, so…
Car hire – Seven Worst Rental-Car Rip-Offs (and How to Beat Them) (huffingtonpost.com) – Just about every segment of the travel industry is rife with rip-offs, but the folks who rent cars have risen gouging to an art form. The worst rip-offs …

Car Hire Reviews – Best Car Rental & Hire Reviews 2016 (moneysavingpro.com) – You can make sure the best car rental is the one you choose, by reviewing car rental companies before taking any further action you can make a sound choice.

Car Rental – How to Save on Car Rentals – Consumer Reports (consumerreports.org) – Want to save money on your next car rental? Get money saving tips from the experts at Consumer Reports.

I was able to do better in my online shopping for good car rental rates than my otherwise very helpful travel agent Brian Chima, so we used my results for that. After searching through and comparing Priceline, Expedia, CarRentals.com, RentalCars.com and others, I used my Alamo Insider status to book through them. Part of the same team are Alamo, Enterprise, and National.

Car Rental Reservations – Alamo Rent A Car (alamo.com) – Start a car rental reservation with Alamo Rent A Car.

Edinburgh – Car Rental at Edinburgh Waverly – Alamo Rent A Car – Rent a car at Edinburgh Waverly from Alamo Rent A Car. Find cheap car rental rates and deals.

NOTE: We followed a tip that car hire at the Annandale St. location would be cheaper than directly from the airport. I can’t recall why we didn’t rent from the Waverly office.

Edinburgh – Car hire | Edinburgh Airport (edinburghairport.com)

Edinburgh – Car hire Edinburgh Airport from Rentalcars.com – Car hire from Edinburgh Airport, in Edinburgh, UK from Car hire 3000. Book your car hire in Edinburgh Airport with no cancellation or amendment fees and worldwide free phone support. Pay less, get more for your Edinburgh Airport car hire

On Street Parking – Glasgow City Council (glasgow.gov.uk)

Parking Glasgow Map (glasgowgis.maps.arcgis.com)

Car license – International Driving Permits (AAA.com) – (text mine) Again, we got these at home, but we ended up not needing them. At least bring your regular driver’s license!

Boat

Below are just a few options for boat travel in a coast-rich land of nearly 200 islands.

CalMac | Summer Timetable | Mallaig to Armadale | Skye – CalMac ferries Summer timetables & fare prices for the Skye, Raasay & Small isles route from Mallaig (west coast) to Armadale (Isle of Skye). CalMac sail to 24 destinations.

Ferry To & From Skye | Visit Skye | CalMac (calmac.co.uk) – Calmac sail to Skye and 23 more destinations on Scotland’s West Coast. Find what a visit to Skye can offer and order your ferry tickets online.

Cruise Scotland – Find a Cruise (cruisescotland.com)

Cruises by Jacobite also does Loch Ness cruises, and there are river-to-sea cruises along the Clyde available from Glasgow. For a general search, start at VisitScotland.

Walking

Top tip from the same Outlander friend who traveled a few months before us: Wear comfortable shoes, especially in Edinburgh, an old, hilly, cobblestone-heavy city. Shoes with good ankle support and cushioned soles. I concur. Hiking boots for country treks. Due to their bulk, consider wearing them on the plane to save suitcase space.

Tourist Tracks Glasgow Tour Pack – Tourist Tracks – (MP3 audio walking tours) Download (2-hour) Glasgow Tour ₤5; Scotland Tour Pack (Edinburgh, Glasgow) ₤8. Walks include a map in pdf format. Route passes by major highlights of central Glasgow.

Terrain

Maps – MunroMagic.com (A page from the Loch Tulla area on our way up through Glen Coe, for the munro Beinn Odhar. A Google map.)

Climate & Weather

You’re not likely to avoid at least one of either cold, rain, strong wind, or clouds during a trip of any significant length in Scotland, but if you’re a weather geek like my husband, you might find some of these resources interesting, if not quite reassuring.

Certainly, as you plan your trip, taking averages and tendencies into account isn’t a bad idea, and knowing when the sun rises and sets helps with scheduling. In our September trip, days were getting shorter, and fall color doesn’t peak till a bit later in the year.

Scotland Weather and Climate | Scottish Weather | Scottish Weather Statistics | Rainfall Chart | Weather Forecast – Scotland Info Guide (scotlandinfo.eu) – Weather and Climate in Scotland includes weather extremes, average rainfall and sunshine charts and the five day weather forecast for the highlands

Climate and Weather – Weather in Scotland in September (climateandweather.com) – Is September a good time to visit Scotland? The summer crowds begin to dissipate, the leaves begin to turn yellow and brown, and the weather is mild and pleasant …

Edinburgh weather – September Weather Averages for Edinburgh, United Kingdom (holiday-weather.com) – Holiday (i.e., vacation) Weather – We provide weather averages for Edinburgh United Kingdom in September

Weather in Scotland – September Weather in Scotland: Temperature, Rain, Sun Averages – Current Results (currentresults.com) – Normal September weather in Scotland, with average high and low temperatures, total monthly rainfall and hours of sunshine for eastern, western and northern regions.

Sun or Moon Rise/Set Table for One Year (aa.usno.navy.mil)

Scotland in the Fall – tips for seeing our autumn colours. — Must See Scotland (must-see-scotland.com) – Scotland in the Fall, or Scotland in autumn as we call it, is a great time to a visit. But when will the colors or colours will be at their peak?

Autumn Color Best Timing – Scotland | Getaway Tips – azcentral.com (getawaytips.azcentral.com) – Although only a hundredth of the ancient Caledonian Forest remains, almost a 5th of Scotland’s land area is covered in trees, most of it in the Highlands.

A climate tip from our Outlander friend: Wear several light layers whether indoors or out, in addition to a coat outdoors if needed. The Scottish indoors tend to be hot because there is no air conditioning in most older, smaller buildings and rustic inns. Up-scale, urban hotels are usually air-conditioned, but expect most interiors from buses to taxis to museums to pubs to be rather warm in the summer, if not year round.

Travel Essentials: Sleep, Eat, Do

I won’t pretend to be an expert on where to eat and sleep any more than I am on other aspects of overseas journeys. There’s already plenty of expert advice, professional services, and phone apps galore to help with these essentials. I’ll just continue with sample resources based on our personal preferences and decisions.

One of the tools I used and liked was the TripAdvisor app. TripAdvisor Mobile and Tablet Apps | Travel Apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, Blackberry, Nokia and Windows Phone – Get your free TripAdvisor travel app

Accommodation

Accommodation – VisitScotland Search results

Scotland accommodation & travel for Scottish holidays – The Internet Guide to Scotland (scotland-info.co.uk) – Independent info about Scotland: travel, tours, accommodation, sightseeing, outdoor activities, castles, genealogy, etc, including the Highlands & Islands. 10 Best Hotels near Edinburgh Airport (EDI) – Hotels.com – Looking to book a cheap hotel near Edinburgh Airport (EDI), Edinburgh? See Hotels.com 10 best local hotels with our lowest price guarantee. Collect 10 nights get 1 free!

Another way in is through municipal guides such as this one for Inverness:

Inverness accommodation – Stay Inverness – The official Inverness City site. A non-commercial city portal guide to the economy, tourism, the environment, leisure facilities, shopping, latest news.

Our Chain Hotels

We got a hotel package through our travel agent for our Edinburgh and Glasgow stays (start and finish of our trip), targeting Marriott properties so we could use my husband’s rewards. That landed us at Residence Inn Edinburgh and Glasgow Marriott, which were both very accommodating accommodations with great staff.

A special shout-out to Ryan at Glasgow Marriott, who corrected a booking date glitch in our reservation and gave us executive lounge access for our trouble.

Residence Inn Edinburgh – Booking.com – The Residence Inn by Marriott Edinburgh has a central Edinburgh location, just a 10-minute walk from the Royal Mile.

Glasgow – Hotels in Glasgow City Centre, Scotland | Glasgow Marriott Hotel – A fabulous city centre location and spacious, light-filled accommodation set the Glasgow Marriott Hotel apart. Visit us, and experience the difference. We also found a parking prices guide in advance for the Glasgow Marriott since we would have our rental car during that part of the trip. Parking Marriott Glasgow P&D_700x900_ v6 Tariff HNG overlay – Car_Parking_Prices.pdf

Our Luxury B&B

I did my own searching and querying to a large number and variety of specialized lodging options throughout central Scotland and Inverness-shire, investigating the Trossachs and Cairngorms National Parks, as well as towns along the Great Glen. My husband and I decided to go budget for one B&B and indulge a little in another. 

Daviot Lodge – Luxury 5 Gold Star Bed & Breakfast near Inverness in the Highlands of Scotland (daviotlodge.co.uk)

Daviot Lodge (Inverness, Scotland) – UPDATED 2016 B&B Reviews – TripAdvisor – Book Daviot Lodge, Inverness on TripAdvisor: See traveler reviews, candid photos, and great deals for Daviot Lodge, ranked #19 of 244 B&Bs / inns in Inverness and rated 4.5 of 5 at TripAdvisor.

I joyfully submitted my review of Daviot Lodge (pron. DAY vee et) through the Glasgow-based website http://www.freetobook.com:

This is what it means to be pampered. Ample parking, cozy sitting room spaces with books and games, breakfast made-to-order, delicious black pudding, fresh fruit, great coffee, beautiful views inside and out. Look out for the adorable little terrier, and for the pheasant! We loved everything about our room, which was eminently comfortable and aesthetically pleasing.

“The Hutchesons were very helpful with travel tips and restaurant bookings, even providing us with a map of the area. Don’t miss the Culloden Battlefield and Visitor Centre museum! The food at Culloden Moor Inn is great, too. The Clava Cairns are also rather wonderful. Cawdor Castle is very scenic. Beauly Priory is gorgeous.

“Daviot Lodge is a quiet, peaceful country retreat on farm land…, yet only a few minutes from downtown Inverness. With this luxury B&B, you can’t go wrong.”

Our Budget B&B

Seabank B&B | B&B Accommodation in Arrochar, Argyll & Bute, Scotland | HomePage – The Seabank B&B is cosy and comfortable providing the perfect retreat after a day of exploring the local area, or somewhere comfortable to break a longer journey.

Seabank | VisitScotland – All rooms are en-suite with TV/DVD, hairdryer, iron/ironing board, tea/coffee making facilities, towels, Wi-Fi and extra bed linen. Our family room sleeps up to 4 people. We also offer a hearty breakfast using only quality ingredients. (“En suite” refers to where the bathroom facilities are located–in the room. Look for that if you prefer your own private restroom and shower to a communal spot.)

I posted my review of Seabank B&B on TripAdvisor just after Christmas 2016:

“Location: 4, Service/Staff: 5, Cleanliness: 5, Facilities: 3.5. Overall: 4. This economy lodging was very good. Dave and Sandy are thoughtful, efficient, accommodating, and very welcoming. Their friendliness and efforts to tailor breakfast and make our room available early to store bags were above expectations. Food was delicious, the spread of options very satisfactory, and the view (of Loch Long, Arrochar) naturally majestic. Coffee was particularly good.

“In-room materials provided tips and options for restaurants and other needs in well-organized and informative fashion. Communication was thorough, prompt, helpful with special local considerations, and convenient with email for pre-visit preparations and post-visit receipt.

“Facilities were well maintained, cozy and manageable. Some visitors may find the room a bit cramped. The bathroom is very slender and sink rather petite so would not be recommended for those with disabilities. Furthermore, the bed was rather uncomfortable because too hard for me; my husband had no trouble.

“The shower was good. We would gladly have extended our 2-night stay if it had been possible. Recommended for most travelers.”

Other Options We Considered

Castle stays – Stay in a Castle | Castle Hotels & Hire – Page 4 | VisitScotland – Browse self-catering castles, castle hotels & stately homes in Scotland. Find unusual accommodation, including tourist-board accredited properties.

Dalhousie Castle And Spa | VisitScotland – Dalhousie Castle is located in Midlothian Scotland, near the town of Bonnyrigg, just 8 miles from Edinburgh’s city centre.The caste was the seat of the Earls of Dalhousie, the chieftains of Clan Ramsay.

Dalhousie Castle Hotel and Aqueous Spa – A real 13th century Scottish Castle 8 miles from Edinburgh’s city centre, holding the title as ‘Scotland’s Oldest Inhabited Castle’.

Brochs in Scotland | Unusual Accommodation | VisitScotland – Find brochs and blackhouses for a stay in Scotland with a twist. Wide range of unusual accommodation, including tourist board-accredited properties.

Dining

As with accommodation, TripAdvisor is as good a place to start as any for eating out.

Taste our Best Edinburgh | Zomato – Taste our Best Edinburgh – Check out the best Menus, Photos, Ratings and Reviews

The following text is all mine.

Our Edinburgh Dining

In Edinburgh, we had particularly excellent dining experiences at Hanam’s (see my post reviewing Hanam’s) on Castle Hill and at Vittoria on the George IV Bridge (comfort Italian with gluten-free pastas available).

Another Edinburgh treasure is Jasmine, the Chinese restaurant across from the Royal Lyceum Theatre. We had just left the Lyceum, having seen John McGrath’s electric, ceilidh-style Scottish history play The Cheviot, the Stag, and the Black, Black Oil, brilliantly updated and performed by Dundee Rep Theatre. At Jasmine, after a long day of Outlander touring and an evening play, we re-fueled just before Jasmine closed at 11pm. I savored the delicious roast duck with plum sauce. Then, we slept in on Sunday.

I also really liked a cullen skink lunch at The Scottish Café, the National Gallery on The Mound, but service was very slow and threw off afternoon plans for our last day in the city. We had a date with Alamo/Enterprise for our rental car before dinner at Hanam’s.

Our Loch Lomond Dining

For most Loch Lomond-area establishments and any sought-after places, be sure to reserve your space at dinner in advance, early the same day or the day before. Daviot Lodge (Daviot, Inverness-shire) and Seabank (Arrochar, Trossachs, Argyll) both offered assistance with reservations, given proper notice.

Although we got caught in the rain after dark without a reservation on the 21st, a winding drive farther north along Loch Lomond from Seabank B&B allowed us to sample The Drovers Inn, Inverarnan, where we ran into our new friend Ádhamh Ó Broin from the prior day’s Argyll excursions. Happy accidents! Food was served late. Loch Lomond Restaurant at The Drovers Inn gave me a comforting meal of bangers and mash. A charming old stay, established 1705, lodging options start here: Drovers Inn and Lodge.

Our Fort William & Mallaig Dining

Maybe I just chose the wrong menu item, but I had only a so-so chicken dish at The Terrace, West Highland Hotel, Mallaig, halfway through our Jacobite train ride.

A forgettable burger with chips awaited us at a pub in Fort William as we headed down to Glasgow for the final leg of our trip. I don’t even remember the place’s name.

Our Cairngorms Dining

Balavil Hotel Restaurant & Bar in Newtonmore, near the Highland Folk Museum (an OL filming site), is where I enjoyed a dinner of Cairngorm ale battered cod and chips, along with the same variety of Dalwhinnie (local) whisky we had sampled at Doune Castle during our Outlander Tour with Slainte Scotland: balavil menus 2016.cdr – Menu 2016.pdf

dscn5241

Balavil Hotel restaurant, Newtonmore, Cairngorms

Our Inverness Dining

Culloden Moor Inn/ Keppoch Bar – Photos (facebook) – Culloden Moor Inn/ Keppoch Bar, Inverness. Just a stone’s throw from Culloden Battlefield & Visitors’ Centre. I loved the roasted veggie & brie filo parcels, salad & boiled potatoes, which I paired with Glenfiddich whisky. All very good!

We also enjoyed a great dining experience at The Riverside Restaurant (riversiderestaurant.info/ – includes their menus) downtown, not to be confused with River House, which is across the River Ness from Riverside. Both are highly rated options. See also TripAdvisor’s Riverside page.

We crossed the vibrating Greig Street bridge to get to Riverside from our parking spot after we discovered River House was booked full. The bridge didn’t vibrate on the walk back, but for some reason it had freaked me out a bit.

From the Riverside evening à la carte menu, under “Our Menus” at http://www.riversiderestaurant.info, I chose “Pan seared Isle of Lewis Scallops on mini potato rostis served with Stornoway Black Pudding & garden pea puree drizzled with Mackintosh of Glendavney (Aberdeenshire) lemon rapeseed oil”–yes, awesome.

The starters I wanted to sample were dainty and well presented, so I paired the scallops & black pudding with an appetizer of “Munros of Dingwall Haggis bon bons rolled in oatmeal served with a potato croquette, turnip puree & peppercorn sauce with a dash of Highland Single Malt Whisky.” The haggis was better than the potatoes. My husband had the large house salad (pictured above), which he enjoyed along with a main entrée.

Ash_Restaurant_Dinner-menu_Inverness.pdf (http://www.ash-inverness.co.uk/images/AshEvening.pdf) – Adjacent to the Inverness ScotRail Station. Here, I had Glenmorangie chicken & soup with Oban whisky. Loved the food, not so much the whisky.

DSCN5891_Ash-Restaurant-Inverness.jpg

See the Google map screen capture below for the locations (counter-clockwise from top left/east) of Ash Restaurant, The Riverside Restaurant, River House, the Inverness Museum, and Inverness Castle.

Inverness-downtown-restaurants-Riverside_2017-06-14

Downtown Inverness on Google Maps, boldfaced labels mine

Our Glasgow Area Dining

After a nice lunch at the Kelvingrove Gallery & Art Museum (I had shepherd’s pie), we visited Glasgow Cathedral, followed by a walk through the shopping district. We then decided to take tea (our first UK tea-time experience) at Glasgow icon, The Willow Tea Rooms, 97 Buchanan Street.

Modeled after Kate Cranston’s Ingram Street Tea Rooms designed by famed artist Charles Rennie Mackintosh in the early 1900s, The Willow Tea Rooms present a cheerful, elegant atmosphere with great treats. I had Jasmine tea, my husband took Kenyan, and we enjoyed mini-sandwiches and a gluten-free chocolate brownie with clotted cream.

Like a character out of Lewis Carroll’s Alice books, an inchworm insisted on enjoying the atmosphere with us during tea. Otherwise, we had the 2nd floor nearly to ourselves.

The Cotton House is a hidden jewel of a Chinese and Thai establishment in Longcroft, Bonnybridge, Stirlingshire. We ate here after swinging by Outlander studios (LBP Outlander Ltd.) in Cumbernauld on our way back to Glasgow from Linlithgow Palace, Linlithgow. I thoroughly enjoyed my pad Thai, and we had a nice chat with our friendly server, who was surprised to see American tourists in this industrial neighborhood. We credited the Outlander phenomenon. It’s a very popular local restaurant, especially at Christmas. It was even hopping during our rainy, late-September lunch hour.

Attractions & Events
Superlatives: Best-of Lists for Scotland

Once you get a broad scan of ideas, you may find yourself link hopping to various best-of lists online. Here are some I found myself exploring, usually at The Daily Record or Scotland Now (also a Daily Record outlet). Lots of pretty pictures.

Scotland the Best: Peter Irvine chooses his top 50 Scottish places to eat, stay and play – Daily Record – THE latest edition of Scottish travel bible Scotland the Best is out and here, author Peter Irvine selects his top 50 places to eat, stay and play.

40 pictures that prove Scotland is more beautiful than you ever believed – Scotland Now – THESE breathtaking pictures of the country’s most enchanting spots will prove that Scotland’s scenery is even more beautiful than you ever believed.

30 places you must visit in Scotland – Daily Record – In Pictures – CHECK out our picture gallery to see some of the most breathtaking places in Scotland.

10 of Scotland’s prettiest towns and villages – Scotland Now – THERE is no question that Scotland has some picturesque villages and towns.

25 Places in Scotland That Are Straight Out of a Fantasy Novel – Who needs Westeros? We’ve got Wester Ross…

12 fairy tale waterfalls in Scotland to see before you die – Daily Record

14 Scottish Places All “Outlander” Fans Must Visit – Never seen Outlander? You should visit these stunning Scottish locations anyway. Warning: Mild Season 1 spoilers ahead…

Special Events on Select Dates

Various traditions of book, film, music, and other festivals, feast days, the Edinburgh military tattoo, regional Highland Games, Gatherings, and other exciting special events occur on select dates in the Scottish calendar. Most major events are during summer, but Hogmanay (New Year’s) and Burns Night (January 25th) are some of the biggest Scottish holidays. Several smaller festivals favor spring and fall as well.

Keep the seasons in mind as you peruse different parks and gardens to visit so you’ll be sure to see them in all their glory—summer, spring or fall. For instance, rhododendrons are a frequently advertised May spectacle.

Something else that interested me was Doors Open Days, an annual event in September during which participating properties open their doors for just a few days to the public for a rare glimpse into their unique and historic treasures.

Doors Open Days (official) – Get into buildings! (Get into usually inaccessible historic buildings every September during Doors Open Days; searchable database and calendar updated annually, sponsored by Scottish Civic Trust and Historic Environment Scotland).

Glasgow Doors Open Day

Nightlife

Edinburgh Concerts, Tickets, Gigs & Tour Dates 2016 – Songkick – (songkick.com) Comprehensive listings and tickets for every upcoming concert, gig and tour date taking place in Edinburgh in 2016. (Also for Glasgow.)

Edinburgh Entertainment – Ents24.com – All Events in Edinburgh – Tickets and information for Edinburgh concerts and more. Also works for searching Glasgow events.

Entertainment Edinburgh – EntaConnect – Ticket/Seat Lyceum The Cheviot, Stag, Oil (bookings.lyceum.org) – The Royal Lyceum Theatre bookings

Edinburgh theatre – What’s On – Traverse Theatre (traverse.co.uk/whats-on)

Opera, Scottish – The Elixir of Love | Scottish Opera (scottishopera.org.uk)

Cultural Miscellany

Scottish History

Scotland – Seduced By History: What’s So Great About 17th Century Scotland?

Did You Know? – Festive Greetings and Toasts

5 best whiskies of 2016 … so far – Scotland Now – WHISKY expert Andy Bell doesn’t want to get political, but finds it interesting that four out of five of his favourite whiskies this year so far are independent.

5 of most beautiful Scottish whisky distilleries – Scotsman Food & Drink – There are over a hundred whisky distilleries in Scotland, here is our selection of the most picturesque.

Speyside whisky – One sip at a time: a guide to whisky tasting in Speyside | DK Eyewitness Travel – Read the One sip at a time: a guide to whisky tasting in Speyside feature, and discover other articles from DK Eyewitness Travel.

Scots Language Centre

Scots-Online – More Links – Links to Scots Language and related websites.

Language – A brief introduction to the Scots language | Resources | Ordnance Survey – Scots is the name for the language of lowland Scotland. Find out more about Scots language and how this is used on placenames in Ordnance Survey maps.

LearnGaelic.net – (A project of Gary Lewis, a.k.a. Colum Mackenzie, and where I learned my rudimentary Scottish Gaelic, 2015-2016.)

Scottish Gaelic language, alphabet and pronunciation – Info about Scottish Gaelic, a Celtic language spoken mainly in Scotland and Nova Scotia, Canada by about 87,000 people.

Scottish Gaelic learners’ materials online

Scottish Gaelic-Dictionary Online Translation LEXILOGOS >> – Scottish Gaelic-English Dictionary Online Translation, Language, Grammar

The Scots – monarchs, ancestry, DNA, Gaelic, Celtic, Brythonic, Dal Riata, Pictish, Scottish, Viking, Irish, north African

Books – Women begin to lead the way in Scottish literature (From Herald Scotland) – That’s not so remarkable in itself until you realise she’s the fifth woman to win this prize in the last six years, joining a mix of fiction and…

Books from Scotland – Home – The largest curated collection of Scottish books online, dedicated to showcasing the very best in Scottish writing & publishing.

Writing, Scotland – Women’s Travel Writings in Scotland: ‘Letters from the Mountains’ by Anne Grant and ‘Letters from the North Highlands’ by Elizabeth Isabella Spence | Books from Scotland

Books from Scotland – In the Shadow of Burns

McGrath – Theatre Scotland, in Scottish Theatrical History – scholarly article discusses McGrath’s work – IJoST Peer Reviewed Article. Vol.3, no.2 : R.Stevenson – IJoST Peer Reviewed Paper: Title-Scottish Guising: Medieval And Modern Theatre Games, Author-S.Carpenter

Macbeth_map.pdf

Map of the Highlands of Scotland denoting the districts or counties inhabited by… – Maps of Scotland, 1560-1928

Film Settings in Scotland – VisitScotland Guide PDF

Outlander

See An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 5, “Slainte Scotland Outlander Tour + Outlander Tourism Resources.” To start or review this series from the beginning, see “An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 1.”

Beyond reading the books, watching the series, and reading Diana’s website and blogs like this one, many OL fans have connected, become friends, and formed groups over social media platforms including Twitter, Facebook, and others, often inspired by following the projects and charities of central figures like Sam Heughan, Caitriona Balfe, and Diana Gabaldon—Herself. Comicons, Gatherings, the Highland Fling, book signings, and other OL-focused or off-shoot events also regularly occur across the U.S. and the globe. Your next travel partner, destination, business partner, or best friend may be waiting in any one of these nooks and crannies of the singularly passionate Outlander universe.


So that’s a wrap! I’ve taken you through highlights of nearly 40 different Outlander filming sites (parts 1, 2, and 3), the nuts and bolts of an Outlander-focused Scotland trip planning and reflection process (part 4), an Outlander tourism extravaganza (part 5), and the connective travel guidance to make that dream trip to Scotland a reality (part 6). Good luck in your planning and travels, feel free to share your questions, comments, or experiences, and slainte mhath!

In future posts, I’ll continue to highlight specific sites visited, services engaged, adventures experienced, and images captured during our trip. Keep coming back to my introductory post “Scotland Ventured, Scotland Gained.” to get the full scope of available bits from just after our trip last fall through the rest of this year.

Until next time, may your anticipation and experience of the Outlander STARZ TV series 3—based on Diana Gabaldon’s 3rd Outlander novel Voyagerbe a joyful one. Outlander STARZ returns September 2017, but remember, the books are always available!


Appendix: Guides to Adventures in Cities and Regions

With an emphasis on Outlander and personal experience, the following guides touch on select areas of: Southern Scotland (E. & S. Ayrshire, Dumfries), Edinburgh, Vicinity of Edinburgh, Kingdom of Fife, Lothians, Glasgow, Argyll & Bute and the Isles, Stirlingshire, Perthshire, The Great Glen, Glen Coe & Lochaber, Highlands, Loch Ness, Cairngorms National Park, Inverness-shire, West Highlands, Isle of Skye, and Northwest Scotland.

Not Covered: Southwest & Borders; Eastern Central regions: St. Andrews, Angus, Dundee, Balmoral Castle; Northeast regions: Aberdeenshire, Fraser Castle, Bowfiddle Rock; Far North; Inner & Outer Hebrides; Orkney; Shetland; Isle of St. Kilda.

Southern Scotland

East Ayrshire Leisure – Find out what’s happening in East Ayrshire’s libraries, museums, sports venues and countryside (including Robert Burns museum and frequented spots).

Edinburgh

The Real Mary King’s Close (official)

Edinburgh Castle – Morning (official) – Tailor your visit with suggested itineraries.

National Museum of Scotland (official) – The natural world, world cultures, art & design, science & tech, and Scottish history—all in one amazing building.

Palace of Holyroodhouse (Royal Collection stewardship site) – Find practical info for you visit, including info on security, refreshments and use of cameras.

Edinburgh Museums – The Writers’ Museum – Writers’ Museum

St Giles’ Cathedral, Edinburgh (official home page)

Gladstone’s Land, Old Town, Edinburgh (NTS)

Edinburgh Parks and gardens – Meadows | The City of Edinburgh Council – Meadows

Vicinity of Edinburgh

Cairnpapple Hill (Historic Environment Scotland (HES) site) – Site of an incredible Neolithic henge monument and a number of important Bronze Age burials.

Blackness Castle (HES site) – Brief snapshot of the history of Blackness Castle; find out what to see when you visit ‘the ship that never sailed’.

Hopetoun House & Estate, near Edinburgh, Scotland (official home page) – Hopetoun House & Estate, outskirts of Edinburgh. House, luxury wedding venue, farm shop, clay shooting and property on 6,500 acre Estate. (Includes Midhope Castle.)

Linlithgow (official home page) – Linlithgow, a Great Visit

Glencorse Old Kirk – Outlander Film Set – Borders Journeys

The Falkirk Wheel | Scottish Canals – The rotating boat lift that connects the Union Canal with the Forth & Clyde. Discover this incredible piece of engineering…!

Kelpies – The Kelpies at The Helix (official home page) – The Helix is Scotland’s newest attraction. Cycle trails, walks, play areas, canals, habitats and artworks await. Also home to The Kelpies, monuments to horse power.

Kingdom of Fife

Culross West Church – Culross, Fife – Places of Worship in Scotland | SCHR – To the NW of Culross in West Kirk Churchyard, surrounded by agricultural land, this is the former parish church of Culross. Scottish Church Heritage Research Ltd (SCHR) maintains a database of over 10,000 places of worship in Scotland.

The Covenanter Hotel, Falkland, Fife

Falkland Palace & Garden

Aberdour Castle – A snapshot of the history of Aberdour Castle in the Kingdom of Fife; find out what to see when you visit this former home of a Regent of Scotland.

East Lothian

Outlander – Preston Mill’s Outlander | National Trust for Scotland USA – In June 2014, 150 cast and crew members from the hit TV show Outlander set up camp at the NTS Property Preston Mill and Phantassie Doocot.

Scottish Seabird Centre | Visit – An interactive wildlife adventure in North Berwick with Discovery Centre, gift shop, cafe and seasonal boat trips. A Scottish five star visitor attraction with something for the whole family, whatever the weather.

Glasgow

Glasgow Guide: Glasgow Places to Visit: Tourist Attractions in Glasgow A to F – The tourist info guide to the city of Glasgow in Scotland includes info for tourists on hotels, shops, pubs, clubs, photographs, visitor attractions, street maps, and more…

Glasgow Cathedral (HES) – Overview of the history of Glasgow Cathedral; find out what to see and do at the most complete medieval cathedral on the Scottish mainland.

Glasgow Museums | Glasgow Life (official home) – Kelvingrove, Riverside, Burrell, GoMA, Glasgow Green & People’s Palace, St Mungo, Provand’s Lordship, Scotland Street School Museum, GMRC.

Glasgow School of Art Tours – Walking Tours of the city and interior tours of the world renowned Mackintosh building at The Glasgow School of Art

Glasgow bagpipes – The National Piping Centre | Bagpipe school, shop, restaurant & hotel in Glasgow, Scotland, UK.

Argyll & Bute and the Isles

Walking and climbing in Argyll and the Isles – Come to Argyll and the Isles for unbeatable walking and climbing. Enjoy epic long-distance routes, magnificent munros, loch-side strolls and coastal treks – all amid stunning Scottish scenery.

The Trossachs National Park & Loch Lomond

Trossachs – The Lodge Forest Visitor Centre – Forestry Commission Scotland

Loch Lomond – Day Trip Loch Lomond Waterfalls – Guided Walking and Sightseeing Highland Day Tours for independent travellers wanting to experience Scotand beyond the major tourist attractions and the confines of a bus.

Farther West: Loch Fyne and the Coast

Inveraray Castle Visitor Information – An iconic Scottish Castle in Argyll, Scotland.

Auchindrain Township, Inveraray. The last surviving example of a Highland farm…

Ádhamh Ó Broin – (11) Gáidhlig Dhail Riada – Gáidhlig Dhail Riada. If you are interested in the rich Gaelic heritage of Dalriada and would like to find out more…

Stirlingshire

Stirling – Official visitors guide to Stirling – Destination Stirling – Stirling is a vibrant Scottish city, home to many of Scotland’s top attractions including Stirling Castle, Bannockburn and The National Wallace Monument.

Doune Castle – Get an overview of Doune Castle in the Central and West region, including its life as home of Regent Albany, and find out what to see at Doune Castle.

Stirling Castle – Step back into the sumptuous world of Stirling Castle’s Royal Court. A great family day out. Book your tickets online now and beat the queues!

Wallace Monument | Stirling Tourist Attraction | Plan Your Visit (official) National Wallace Monument. A world famous landmark, in a stunning location, come and visit one of Scotland’s most magnificent sights. Meet Scotland’s national hero, William Wallace.

Bannockburn: The Battle of Bannockburn – The 3D Battle of Bannockburn Experience allows visitors to experience medieval combat like never before.

Perthshire

Walking, Cycling, Horse-riding around Perthshire – From Dunalastair Holiday Cottages you can enjoy walking, cycling and horse-riding around Perthshire.

Kinloch Rannoch, Tummel Bridge, Loch Rannoch, walking holidays, wildlife watching, fishing, highland clans – Kinloch Rannoch and Tummel, Perthshire, Scotland – a haven of Scottish native wildlife and unspoilt landscape of mountains, lochs and heather covered hills where walking is pure pleasure

Perth & Kinross Countryside Trust | Pages | Perthshire Big Tree Country – PKCT is a charity that negotiates access to land, builds footpaths, helps care for Scotland’s most spectacular woodlands and works on conservation projects.

Carie (Rannoch Forest) Walk – Highland Perthshire site – Tourist information for Highland Perthshire, Scotland, including Pitlochry, Aberfeldy, Dunkeld, Kinloch Rannoch and Blair Atholl.

The Great Glen

Great Glen Rough Guides Snapshot Scotland | Rough Guides – The Rough Guide Snapshot The Great Glen is the ultimate travel guide to this spectacular part of Scotland. It guides you through the region with reliable

Glen Coe & Lochaber

Glencoe Scotland | Glencoe Scotland – Glencoe Scotland is Clachaig’s guide to Scotland’s most famous glen. Arguably the most historic glen and recently voted the most romantic glen in Scot.

Glen Coe area – Britain’s Only Mountain Gondola | Scotland Cable Car | Nevis Range – Nevis Range is a year round mountain ski resort in the The Highlands of Scotland near Ben Nevis and Fort William. Skiing and snowboarding in winter sightseeing and gondola rides in summer with spectacular views. Mountain biking and world cup held at Nevis

Glencoe & Dalness (NTS)

Fort William & Lochaber Guide, Things To Do, Events, Activities – Fort William and the surrounding Lochaber area is the self-proclaimed capital of outdoor sports.

Highlands

Rough Guides – The Central Highlands Rough Guides Snapshot Scotland – The Rough Guide Snapshot The Central Highlands is the ultimate travel guide to this dramatic part of Scotland. It guides you through the region with reliable

All Day Highland Tours around Loch Ness and the northern and western Highlands – All Day Highland Tours around Loch Ness and the northern and western Highlands

Highland Wildlife & Birdwatch Safaris | VisitScotland – Guided wildlife excursions, in small, friendly groups with an experienced local nature watcher, in some of the most beautiful scenery in the world.

Loch Ness

Urquhart Castle sits on the shores of beautiful Loch Ness | Urquhart Castle – Urquhart Castle is close to Drumnadrochit, on the shores of Loch Ness. Seized after Edward I’s invasion of Scotland, it was reclaimed by Robert the Bruce in the 14th century.

Loch Ness – The best crew and fleet on Loch Ness | Cruise Loch Ness – Our team are passionate and know everything about Loch Ness and the surrounding area. They’ll do all they can to make your cruise or RIB trip memorable.

Loch Ness – Tour Search – Loch Ness by Jacobite

Cairngorms National Park

Landscape Areas – Cairngorms National Park Authority

Local Search Results | Visit Cairngoms

Highland Folk Museum – Visitor Information

Inverness and Environs

Inverness Information Centre | VisitScotland – The Highland capital’s official source for info on everything to do and see in Inverness & the Highlands. Our enthusiastic team can help you book your stay, transport, day trips and cruises on Loch Ness.

Highlanders Museum, Fort George, Scotland – Highland Regiments Archive – The Highlanders Museum, Scotland, Fort George. The Seaforth Highlanders, The Queen’s Own Highlanders and Cameron Highlanders Archive

Culloden – PPF

Clava Cairns – Clava Cairns, one of Scotland’s most evocative prehistoric sites.

West Highlands

Glen Affric: Glen Affric Map – Map of Glen Affric (Highland) from Gazetteer for Scotland

Jacobite Steam Train – Official Site – The World’s Greatest Railway Journey, Fort William to Mallaig – Online Booking Now Available, West Coast Railways Regular Steam Train Trips on The Jacobite – West Coast Railways provide Regular Steam Train trips throughout the UK Online Booking Now Available.

Mallaig Feature Page on Undiscovered Scotland – Information about and images of Mallaig at the end of the Road to the Isles on Undiscovered Scotland.

Otters – Kylerhea Otter Hide Car Park, Glenelg – Kylerhea Otter Hide Car Park located at Glenelg (IV42 8) Tel: 01320 366322 Contact details and map.

Islands

Isle of Skye Visitor Attractions (Walkhighlands) – 18 Isle of Skye visitor attractions.

Northwest Scotland

Beauly Visitor Guide, Hotels, Cottages, Things to Do in Scotland – Visitor guide to Beauly in Scotland with advice tourism and travel information, maps, history, transport, popular places, accommodation. Plan your perfect holidays in Scotland

Scottish Castles Photo Library – Beaufort Castle, Beauly

Save
Continue reading

Scottish Color: A Photo Essay

From my trip photo collection, sample the colors and textures of Scotland.

Stirling Castle and environs is one of the most colorful places on Scottish soil. From the castle’s view of varied shades of green hills and darker trees, to rows of gray houses below and its flagged, green terraces above flower gardens, to the sumptuous tapestries, royal bedroom furniture, majestic banners, interactive kids’ exhibits, period re-enactors, to paintings and fabrics on wall, floor, and ceiling, this historic seat of power is well worth more than one visit. And don’t forget the Wallace National Monument on the next tree-covered hill to the northeast.

Besides being uniquely spectacular in mountain majesty, Glencoe is Glen Colorful. Most striking to me in contrast to shorter deciduous-covered hills of the Ohio Valley and the sharper, starker, browner Rocky Mountains in the States are the blankets of green that cover the slopes of many of these ancient peaks in the Scottish Highlands. It’s my kind of green mountain.

Some leafy trees sprinkle about them, creep up their sedimentary seams where the water rushes to the bottom. But some later-installed conifers in Argyll, the Cairngorms, and periodically up the Great Glen impose themselves like patches of black-on-black tartan made too small for its wearer. Forestry efforts compete with natural beauty. The most prized evergreens are the Caledonian forests of Scots pine, now mere remnants in the country.

All over Scotland, with a high average rainfall, green is the go-to background color. Lichens, mosses, grasses and ferns are just a few of the non-arboreal results of this pervasive canvas. Princes Street Gardens in Edinburgh and the plethora of green spaces in Glasgow, which means “dear green place” from the (correction) “green hollow” in Gaelic, attest to green’s primacy in Scotland.

Red is another dominant hue in both wild and domestic Scotland. Red deer, red squirrels, Highland cows, some spray-painted sheep, and various burgundy, rust, and orange and yellow flora mingle with the greens. Ferns fade into bracken with the fall, and heather pops magenta-purple and then fizzles grey into autumn across the country’s vast moors and storied glens. Sandstone is the other big red. The Beauly Priory is a breathtaking example of ruins made largely of red sandstone.

Lilac purples add magic to the greens and reds in both sun and shade, not just with the plentiful heather but with foxgloves, gems in cultivated gardens, and of course, the national flower, the thistle. But many flowers and plants retain their bright colors well into winter, re-blooming periodically, and the typical temperate-zone transition from green summer into red, yellow, orange, and brown fall happens in Scotland, too.

Sheep are everywhere, like the grass they munch, and you probably know what that looks like. The flocks power the long-standing textile industry of wool and tweed in Scotland. Tartan long ago sported muted tones that blended with the natural landscape. After having been banned by the Crown following the Jacobites’ defeat at the 1746 Battle of Culloden, tartan’s revival in the late 1800s brought with it a flashier spectrum. Today, even women and girls can benefit from the plentiful choices in feminine shades among the clan-based plaids available at tourist shopping hot spots.

The waters of life in the land of Scots range from root-beer rapids of brown and foam along the walking paths at Carie Forest near Loch Rannoch, Perthshire, to the golden gamut of whiskies forged in distilleries from the islands to the northern Highlands, to the deep-sea and turquoise blues of clear-sky-reflecting burns, rivers, firths, bays, and lochs. Modern Scotland has done its best with drinking water bottled from mountain sources, and then its worst in the hopelessly sugary, bubble-gum-flavored orange soda that is the national drink, Irn Bru.

The British tea tradition also persists, alive and well in both city and countryside. A venture to Glasgow’s Willow Tea Room, designed by the celebrated Charles Rennie Mackintosh, gave my husband good Kenyan black tea and me some aromatic Jasmine green tea, neatly cut finger sandwiches, and a gluten-free chocolate brownie topped with clotted cream. I finished all of my teapot’s worth with pleasure, and I’m not even much of a tea drinker.

I guess it was the blend of artistic atmosphere, my first real experience of tea time, and a well-chosen tea. Making it more memorable was an inchworm Jason discovered on his jacket from recent outdoor adventures. In and out of sight, we kept him alive till I dropped him accidentally on the stairway as we left. His ultimate fate is a mystery.

It was also in Glasgow that we learned about the Glasgow Boys group of artists and the Scottish colourists featured in Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum. Influences from French Impressionists to “Whistler’s Mother,” and of course Scottish landscapes, informed their work over the years. There are life waters, watercolours, and water horses in Scotland. Modern architecture like the Kelpies, at the Helix car park and recreation center near Falkirk, celebrates the country’s artistic and industrial traditions, while one white and one black horse graze at the site of the Culloden Battlefield.

Wild bird coloring is not all that different from home. The British robin redbreast is a distinctly different species from our American robin, a rounder, more petite orange-breasted songbird with a song that sounds prettier to my untrained ear than that of the omnipresent States-side version. I knew about that difference before landing in Scotland, but I was surprised to see the dapper-looking pheasant hanging around the farm bird feeders at the breakfast windows of our luxury B&B near Inverness.

Not quite ring-necked, this male turns out to be the common pheasant of the UK, introduced to Roman Britain as a game bird from Asia. His aristocratic associations befitted our romantic, up-scale portion of the trip, evidenced by the rich red and white furnishings amidst the dark four posts of the bed and the crystalline bed-side dimmer lamps. They even gave us complimentary Ferrero Rocher truffles and a crystal of sherry and two champagne glasses.

There’s a variety of local color in soccer jerseys on display at the National Museum of Scottish Football at Hampden Park, Glasgow, home of the Queen’s Park Rangers and the Scottish National Team. But some of the most colorful parts of Scotland are still its people. The dialects, sensibilities, hotel and B&B personnel, street performers, musicians including guitarists, accordianists, bagpipers, and fiddlers, cab drivers, store cashiers, theatre players, tourism workers from receptionists to historical figure actors, mostly courteous drivers we encountered, and everyday people were always, for better or worse, innocuous, pleasant, and helpful. Good for us tourists, certainly.

Whites, blacks, and greys in the buildings, ruins, and stone monuments pulled us back in time to the mysteries of archaeological evolution. That is, the presence alone of chambered cairns and standing stone circles fascinates, but it’s even more interesting to learn of the layers of change their shapes represent, the multiple peoples and purposes that swept through a given place, obscuring the earlier inhabitants and users, muddling the picture of a Pict or a Scot or an Angle or a Roman. The clues keep bubbling to the surface in diverse ways, and their hunt can become an obsession, and a literary inspiration in the cases of authors such as Diana Gabaldon of the Outlander series.

Whether you’re one for science or for literature, which Gabaldon and I both are, the romance of the past is real, palpable, just as the puzzles, if not the ghosts, left by the remnants beckon the solvers forward. Ruins, especially religious ones even to this agnostic, possess the most affecting beauty of all historic buildings, and the monoliths are at least figuratively magnetic. Ruins speak in a steady voice of struggle, violence, survival, and death. They show the creativity, innovation, reverence, passions, sorrows, and daily subsistence of peoples long gone, and sometimes they demonstrate long periods of thriving, the revival of resilient groups, and the diligence of those dedicated to preserving history and memory.

At the Clava Cairns, I touched some of the piled stones as I walked into the center of one chambered cairn, but semi-unconsciously, I avoided touching the split standing stones. The stones at this site are said to have inspired Gabaldon’s invention of Craigh na Dun, the central plot mechanism–strange and terrifying–of the entire Outlander saga. The ubiquitous nature of stone and stonework in Scotland adds an indescribable charm to visiting this old country when one’s own is so young by contrast, but the stories they inspired are what sent me there.

dscn3198

The Writers’ Museum, Edinburgh

There’s no generalizing Scotland, and yet the tourist tends heavily toward equating places with their people. In the end, they are inextricable, multi-dimensional, many-layered and intriguing enough to merit repeat exploration.

Besides, I just love to hear Scots speak, even if I don’t understand them the first time, or, in the case of Glaswegians, the second or third. Although I’ve seen a lot, I hope I’ll get another chance to practice listening in Scotland.

All photos copyright C.L. Tangenberg

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Review: Sandringham in Outlander STARZ – Beyond Adaptation

Previewed in my post Five-Phrase Friday (37): No “Callow” Craft, this review takes an in-depth look at the final scene of Episode 202, “Not in Scotland Anymore,” in the second series of Outlander STARZ, based on Diana Gabaldon’s second Outlander book Dragonfly in Amber. It is an episode that manages to capture practically everything our heroes grapple with for the rest of the first half of the season. Spoilers imminent.

Paris, 1744. Escape, recovery, new purpose, new digs. Specters of a horrid past in Scotland and its bloody future. Mysticism and superstition in France as in the Scottish Highlands. Duels and fighting practiced, threatened, and restrained. War and religion married in royal ambition. Wine and money mixing with political lies and secret agendas.

Sex, sex, and more sex in anticipation, pursuit, dark corners, and gossip. The irony of an extremely sexy early marriage in Scotland for Claire and Jamie Fraser juxtaposed against their sex-deprived Paris in the aftermath of Jamie’s severe psycho-sexual trauma–at the hands of a real psycho. Old flames re-surfacing. A lowest-cut, billowing blood-red dress. A constipated King Louis XV and his nipple-pierced mistress. A new aristocratic friend forged through sexual misunderstanding.

And finally, an utter change of tone–in the forms of a truly nauseating reunion and a devastating revelation–occurs amidst inner and outer fires and explosions.

Overview

This final scene featuring the Duke of Sandringham’s reappearance begins about seven minutes from episode’s end. For that duration, British actor Simon Callow commands both light and darkness with the aplomb his fans have come to expect and relish.

In this single performance, Callow encapsulates the intriguing essence of the character he and the show’s writers have adapted from Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander book series. Sandringham delivers the final blow to Claire that brings her full circle back to Jamie’s nightmare at the episode’s opening:

Sexual sadist and pervert (Gabaldon’s description) “Black Jack Randall is dead” but “alive in [Jamie’s] head” at the start, and by the end, between them, only Claire learns that Randall is in fact very much alive.

And who should deliver the news? Not even Sandringham, but his secretary Alexander Randall, diminutive, sickly younger brother to the infamously brutish captain. Sandringham’s superior skill in verbal dueling with Claire takes center stage until Alex’s arrival, which, unaided by Sandringham’s intent, perpetrates the final stab for him.

The journey from Murtagh’s spotting of the Duke in the room at Versailles to that painful revelatory moment is intricately layered, extremely tense, and fascinating to watch.

Every single thing the Duke of Sandringham says to Claire and Jamie in this scene represents a provoking, passive-aggressive lunge at them even as he attempts to weasel himself into the position of pitiable victim. His Grace is a walking, talking contradiction, playing his opposing motives, impulses, and meanings off each other to perfection.

Gentlemanly pleasantries interlace with dark, survivalist intentions, and pretenses of buffoonery with calculated and carefully selected barbs. Although not neatly archetypal, Sandringham proves to be the ultimate gentleman jester who only lightly masks his malevolent master mind. The Duke by turns hints at and blatantly flashes his many sides, remaining unnervingly difficult to parse.

Both the more direct, baritoned Sandringham, in conversation with Claire alone, and the falsely polite tenor one, in the presence of Jamie, communicate things that are observable as well as implied or waiting to be revealed.

Beat by Beat: The Lines–and Spaces in Between

A breakdown of character interactions and of the Duke of Sandringham’s comments to Claire and Jamie in this one scene alone makes plain the existence of these layers. Only in the context of known back story, established in the latter half of season one, can the nature of the immediate Fraser-Sandringham conflict and its significance be fully appreciated.

I break the scene down roughly into beats. A beat in story performance can be thought of as “a bubble of action, of dialogue, of thought, or of mood” (source) that represents a shift within a scene.

This final scene makes excellent use of sound and silence (another kind of beat) to convey emotion and drama. Note that the screenwriters may think of these divisions differently; this is my interpretation, with beats labeled by purpose or nature of shift.

Beat 1: Disaster Averted. To open the scene, Jamie thwarts Murtagh’s attempt to exact revenge for the Duke’s treachery, which Black Jack Randall had revealed to Jamie at Wentworth Prison when he burned the intercepted petition of complaint against himself.

The Frasers had entrusted the document to Sandringham for conveyance to London’s Court of Sessions, hoping the accusations of gross sexual impropriety and violence committed by Randall against Claire would countermand Randall’s false accusation of murder against Jamie.

Beat 2: Overture of Good Will. Turning around, a visibly uncomfortable Jamie, shoulders elevated, receives the Duke’s greeting:

“Jamie, dear boy, upon my word. I’m delighted to see you looking so healthy.” The last two words stretch in special emphasis.

While not necessarily insincere, this sentiment, finishing with a broad smile and a glint in the Duke’s eye, could imply he must have some degree of knowledge about what Jamie suffered in the prison dungeon with Randall. Jamie may wonder about this while recalling that time when he was definitely not so healthy. Coming from a known associate of Randall’s and a proven betrayer to Jamie and Claire, reference to Jamie’s health undoubtedly makes him feel ill, but Claire soon catches up, which gives him a moment to recover.

0_Jamie_ill_sohealthy_Sandringham_ep202_final_scene

So touched by your concern . . .

Whatever secrets Sandringham may be privy to, the opening comment need be about nothing more than the fact that Jamie recently had been on the verge of death at the hangman’s noose, a matter of public knowledge. He was caught by redcoats in Scotland, tried for murder (Randall had, according to one witness, shot his own sergeant dead before pinning it on Jamie), convicted, and sentenced within a few days while Murtagh and Claire searched the Highlands countryside for him.

The pardon for which Sandringham’s assistance was supposed to pave the way not only did not come in time but was prevented altogether when Randall wrested from Sandringham’s hands their petition document.

More than our shared knowledge of Jamie’s traumatic past, it is the uncertainty in the audience about what exactly Sandringham knows of this not-so-distant history that heightens the suspense and makes his remark to Jamie about his health so unsettling.

Beat 3: Full Reunion. Before Jamie has a chance to respond, the Duke has spotted Claire and begins addressing her with a higher pitch, volume, and degree of intensity. Again in a stretched cadence, he emphasizes her name. “Mrs. Fraser, what a joyful reunion!” he says while reaching slowly for her hands in greeting. Frowning, she withdraws them and notes coldly that she wishes she could share his appraisal of the situation.

Beat 4: Deeply Cut. “You cut me to the quick!” the Duke reacts, straightening in mock offense.

Beat 5: The Wriggling Begins. Then, relaxing, he concedes, “Well, I suppose I deserve it. Let me assure you, I had every intention of delivering that petition of complaint to the Court of Sessions, as I had pledged to do. It was that damned Randall! The brute insisted I give it to him, instead. I had no choice, whatsoever. Will you ever forgive me?”

0_Claire_face_reacts_to_Sandringham_excuses_ep202_final_scene

Sure, and I’m Queen of France.

As the Duke professes coercion by Randall, Jamie has joined Claire’s side and gives him a sidelong look of severe doubt. Unflappable as always, ironically, it is Sandringham whose daggers most penetrate, though he says he’s been “cut.”

 

Beat 6: “Forgiveness.” Considering the Duke’s apology, Jamie then looks at Claire and Murtagh, who is pacing like a caged animal behind them, before he exhales and declares bygones: “What’s done is done.” Jamie knows the importance of smoothing things over with the influential aristocrat (an invented character rather than a historical one).

Sandringham replies, “How true. What’s passed is passed.” The opening and closing of the line drag out here.

Beat 7: Catching Up. He immediately asks, “What are you both doing here in France?”

Such a casual question under most circumstances, again, this one is loaded. As if he didn’t know Britain is no longer safe for them. As if they could have gone anywhere else after fleeing Britain. As if he didn’t know that simply by asking such a question, he is again putting them in an uncomfortable position. Whatever else he may know, the Duke must know that their going to France was no idle decision, as his impertinent question implies.

When Claire responds by explaining Jamie’s been employed by his cousin Jared, she has interjected for Jamie, whose face becomes clouded with consternation, alarmed at the Duke’s question and likely wondering what answer to make.

Beat 8: Capitalizing. Sandringham wastes no time in snapping up the opportunity to buy them off. “The wine merchant? What a serendipitous surprise. Tomorrow I go back to England, but I shall return shortly, and when I do, I should be very interested to sample some of that rare Belle Rouge port I understand he’s stocking. I must have a case.”

0_Duke_serendipitous_surprise_wine_merchant_ep202_finalscene

surprised serendipity

How surprising he truly finds their new status is anyone’s guess, but we’re fairly certain serendipity is not involved. He has fabricated it to meet the demands of the moment.

“How much?” Jamie asks, drawing Claire’s incredulous face to him.

“I’d be willing to pay twenty percent over the asking price,” Sandringham offers.

“Sold,” Jamie says with a brief smile while Claire looks indignant on his behalf.

Beat 9: Apology Not Accepted. After Murtagh surmises the Duke’s purchase method (credit) as a way of implying payment may never come, Claire suggests that Jamie and Murtagh go and have a drink with “our new friend, the Minister of Finance,” and on this last phrase she speaks directly to the Duke, as if to pre-empt Sandringham’s next anticipated attack by emphasizing their powerful friends.

Beat 10: A Woman Scorned. The two Highlanders take their leave after a few moments of tense silence during which the smile has faded from the Duke’s face. Perhaps he dreads being alone with Mrs. Fraser? Jamie forces a smile and bows slightly as he departs with a glance at Claire.

0_Duke_concerned_frown_eye_to_Claire_drink_idea_ep202_finalscene

Oh, crap. The pleasant spouse is leaving.

Head lowered, eyes following Claire, Sandringham’s stare never leaves her as she turns her back, ostensibly to watch her husband leave, and then slowly moves to face the fireplace, not speaking.

0_Duke_eyeing_Claire_fireplace_ep202_finalscene

You won’t catch me napping.

Almost 20 seconds of silence pass after Claire sends Jamie and Murtagh away.

Beat 11: The First Mask Falls. The first to speak, Sandringham’s next line arrives in a lower, more ominous tone:

“I see you’re already cultivating important people in high places. How very in keeping with your character.” His remarks and the fact that he speaks first assure us the Duke does not fear her. She says nothing, brooding in the firelight. His accusation betrays his hypocrisy.

Beat 12: A Thinner Mask Applies. Has personal insult not sufficed? Approaching her side, Sandringham pokes Claire again: “Poor Jamie. He must be missing Scotland terribly, but I suppose it’s no longer a safe haven for either of you.” Another broad grin accompanies the last line’s inflection and matching look up at her.

Beat 13: She Speaks. She does not look at him but has fully felt the jab. “Hmph,” and she smiles, entering the game. “Yes, and so here we all are.” She raises her gaze to the mantel and above.

Beat 14: She Aims. A new thought then seems to occur to her as she finally looks at the Duke: “On the same side, no less. All supporters of the Jacobite cause.” The tone in the second line is questioning, but Claire remains fairly certain of Sandringham’s allegiance.

The camera shifts to the Duke’s face, which betrays nothing either way.

0_Duke_betraysnothing_JacobiteCause_Claire_ep202_finalscene

Ah, the question of sides . . .

Beat 15: She Lunges. Claire then turns fully to face him and deliver her best possible thrust: “Of course, you being an English aristocrat, that position makes you a traitor to the crown.” Again, a questioning inflection, but more out of provocation as she stares down into his face from her superior height.

0_Claire_to_Duke_traitortocrown_ep202_finalscene

J’accuse!

Beat 16: The Veil Drops, Another Remains. “I see time has done nothing to dull the sharpness of your tongue, Madame.” Unprovoked, the Duke has chosen to down-shift into a personal response to the trivia of Claire’s impoliteness. He has not answered her accusation, just as she did not answer his earlier one. His secrets remain safely his.

0_Duke_to_Claire_sharp_tongue_ep202_finalscene

At least her tongue isn’t forked, Sandy!

Claire slowly smiles in feigned politeness, a smirk the Duke returns. Five seconds tick away as they hold each other’s gaze, neither daring to flinch.

Beat 17: Distraction. Alex then enters, gaining the Duke’s attention, announces the impending fireworks, and proceeds to cough, breaking the spell.

“If you must cough on someone, find a servant.”

0_Duke_grumpyface_findaservant_cough_ep202_finalscene

Don’t cough on me, dammit!

Reconsidering his scornful snap, the Duke glances at Claire and asks, “Was that a bit harsh?” Pettiness and irritation at a servant echo His Grace’s behavior during his first meeting with Claire in episode 109, “By the Pricking of My Thumbs.” It almost seems like a coping mechanism, his way of deflecting Claire’s unfamiliar female aggression, taking his discomfort out on a bystander.

She replies, “Oh, just a little,” and turns her attention to her healing function.

Beat 18: Reprieve: A Pleasant Exchange. Alex and Claire discuss the cough and Mary Hawkins, to whom he had been speaking earlier, while Sandringham listens in silence.

Beat 19: Return to the Game. Then, no doubt sensing a chance to continue the verbal duel, he perks up: “Where are my manners? Mrs. Claire Fraser, may I introduce my new secretary, Alexander Randall.”

Beat 20: Messenger of Menace.Yes, the name is not a coincidence. Alex is the younger brother of Captain Jonathan Randall, Esquire.”

0_Duke_yes_not_a_coincidence_intros_Alex_to_Claire_ep202_finalscene

0_Claire_reacts_Alex_bro_to_Jack_ep202_finalscene

Another Randall? Jesus H. Roosevelt Christ! Is anyone not related to Frank?

To Alex he adds in a more subdued volume and pitch what seems like a casual afterthought, but to Claire, it’s another jab: “Mrs. Fraser and your brother are very well acquainted.” Well acquainted but not acquainted well, which Sandringham knows very well. His satisfaction in this otherwise trivial note is palpable.

Beat 21: Unwitting Accomplice. Alex, oblivious to all that has been happening, innocently says he’ll tell “Jonathan” that he has met Mrs. Fraser. My first reaction, as a book fan, was, “Oh, no, no! Don’t tell him!” forgetting that the show prior to this moment had yet to reveal Randall’s still being alive. The idea of addressing a dead man puzzles Claire.

Beat 22: Utter Confusion, in Micro-Beats. “Tell him? I don’t understand.” With pauses between her sentences, she looks from man to man, searching for the clarity they can only guess at. “Your brother, he isn’t . . . dead?”

0_Claire_doesnt_understand_ep202_finalscene

What, is this kid crazy?

0_Duke_waits_for_light_to_dawn_ep202_finalscene

The Duke waits patiently for light to dawn

Beat 23: Final Blow: A Virtual Stomach Punch. Alex scoffs and explains he’s heard from his brother by post quite recently. In shock, Claire visibly weakens at the knees, as if Alex were again delivering to her mid-section the fist she received there from Black Jack in episode 106, “The Garrison Commander.”

The Duke and Alex both step forward instinctively in response to a damsel’s distress. Sandringham asks, “Can I be of assistance?” but Claire, clearly shaken, professes to be fine. The Duke slowly and slightly smiles as he backs off. The wrinkle? What must Alex be thinking? How confusing must it be to see someone react so negatively to hearing his brother is alive!

0_Claire_falters_Alex_Duke_step_ep202_finalscene

The Deepest Cut

Beat 24: Reeling in Recovery. Claire recovers her self-possession, declines assistance, and says she must have been mistaken.

0_Claire_recovers_false_rumor_demise_ep202_finalscene

I don’t believe this. I don’t believe it. I don’t.

Beat 25: Revelation and Mockery. Alex concedes Randall was wounded. Then, the camera shifts to Sandringham as Alex mentions the wounds being “not insignificant.” The man is nodding sloppily in glee, a moment of relish for him–now a delighted spectator of Claire’s suffering–and a moment of audience appreciation for Callow’s devilish though humorous head jiggle. It was the first moment when I really started loving to hate the Duke. Alex concludes by remarking on Jonathan’s “stronger constitution than my own” and proceeds to cough again.

0_Duke_nodding_wounds_not_insignificant_ep202_finalscene

I’ll just let trusty little Al finish you off, maybe join the lads for a wee nip.

Beat 26: Height of Festivity Meets Pit of Anguish. The fireworks quickly take over with a first boom, at which Claire startles. In the ultimate irony of the scene, the men turn to the show while Claire is left to cope with a vastly changed reality. The implications are profound and stand to jeopardize everything, as Claire’s voiceover explains at the end.

“Oh! How lovely!” Sandringham says with a chuckle.

0_Claire_shellshocked_fireworks_start_ep202_finalscene

Why can’t the bastard just die already?

Beat 27: Victorious Withdrawal, Gloating. After a pause, the Duke asks Alex between gritting teeth, “But must they be so thunderous?” Clearly bored already, he says to Alex, “Go and fetch my carriage.”

0_Duke_aw_yeah_take_that_look_at_Claire_ep202_finalscene

Aw, yeah. Boom! Touche, Lady Biotch Tuarach.

After Alex leaves, a swagger, a gradual turn back to see Claire’s face, and the Duke of Sandringham backs toward the doorway with a smug smile, knowing he’s won this round, and a groaning, mouth-wide half laugh as he turns away to exit. Viewer hatred of the Duke resurges. This is that “what an asshole” moment.

0_Duke_backing_away_gloating_ep202_finalscene

Hee, hee. Yeah, that’s gotta hurt. . .

Sandringham’s dueling opponent is wounded and down, inert and weapon-less. In a stroke of good fortune, his superior knowledge and, thus, readiness have given him the upper hand and assured satisfaction. The Duke exits.

Beat 28: Oh, God. What Now? The scene and episode end with Claire processing the horrible news via voiced-over thoughts and questions, with ominous strings rising. Telling Jamie that Black Jack is alive means risking their efforts to stop the Jacobite rebellion if Jamie insists on revenge. The blue lights of the fireworks flash against the indoor walls and crowd of the French Court, mimicking a thunderstorm.

0_Claire_alone_free_to_panic_ep202_finalscene

Good, he’s gone. I can panic in peace. . .

The camera follows Claire’s worried search to where Jamie and Murtagh chat with Duverney, the Minister of Finance. The fear and uncertainty of what will happen next envelop her.

0_Claire_deeply_worried_look_at_Jamie_ep202_finalscene

. . . cuz here comes my husband, the Viking berserker.

Then, the camera shifts to the outdoor explosions through the windows as the music surges, contrasting luxurious entertainment and Baroque splendor with Claire’s high anxiety and despair, that the Frasers’ Captain Randall nightmare is in fact as alive as he is.


Summary

The expansion of the Duke of Sandringham character’s role in the story from the book version allows Simon Callow this spotlight. Although events transpire differently in the book, the show’s Sandringham experiences the thrill of being the one to help deliver this nasty surprise to Claire.

All of this happens in seven on-screen minutes, and the scene does not feel rushed at all. Nor does it drag, for all the extended silences, stretched syllables, and wordless daggers.

The layers are what make this possible–the indirect allusions, veiled and overt threats, hidden agendas, ironic intentions, secret knowledge, emotional baggage, Sandringham’s two-faced persona, and a complicated lead-up story.

Exposing the layers and what lies beneath them enables the viewer to experience the scene anew, watch it again with added richness, and continue to follow the story with greater edification, entertainment, and intrigue.

Central to this wonderful impact is Simon Callow’s keen invigoration of the material.

Great Elements of Callow’s Craft: Constructing Sandringham

Delivery:

  • Deep voice, gaspy bellowing, snide snapping
  • Slow, drawn-out phrases that make him sound out of breath but mainly old and demanding of patience, especially as he wheedles and whines for absolution
  • Rise and fall of pitch and timbre, a meandering vocalization the highs and lows of which he is able to travel with ease and nonchalance, like a snake slithering
  • Body movement, gesture, posture, tilt, bounce, smile, hand flap, eyebrow action–all inform the flighty persona belying darker motives.

Writing Made Flesh:

  • Long on compliments and flattery, short on sincerity but unapologetic for pettiness born of privilege and its indulgence, he assuages, persuades, puts out fires, stokes them too, and grins and bears it all with grace.
  • Fickle and flippant on the surface but methodical and discerning beneath, he is a flamboyant, self-assured puppeteer who enjoys the game of manipulation.
  • He’s such a presence and a multi-faceted character, he makes you forget he’s gay, a skill which is part and parcel of the character’s wiles.
  • By turns playful and grave, the Duke of Callow’s creation communicates that both states are only ever a mask hiding a more complex inner truth.

As the malevolent jester mastermind, Sandringham mimics Twelfth Night‘s Feste without the truthfulness, or true benevolence. A grand chess master masquerading as a colorful fool, the Duke’s power lies in the convergence of his noble status, self-possession, shrewd calculus, and mercurial behavior. Callow has added distinctive dimensions to the character that are sheer joy to watch.

A Final Note: Shooting of the Scene

Along with Simon Callow’s presence and performance as the Duke of Sandringham, the success of the Outlander series comes down to consistent leadership and dedication that ensure all the right elements fall into place in scenes like this last one of “Not in Scotland Anymore.” The world building alone has been impressive in season one and season two.

The microcosm of ep202’s final scene echoes and augments the larger-scale excellence. Storytelling and screen techniques combine to create a space and context befitting such forces of nature as we find in actors Simon Callow and Caitriona Balfe. The sparks of verbal dueling fly, and the actors utterly fill that space. Here are some (literal and figurative) highlights of those key motifs of scene.

Lighting plays a massive role in this scene’s juxtapositions and ironic effects. Flickering light in two basic forms provides the bulk of the scene’s visual symbolism as both allusion and foreshadowing. The yellow fireplace light dapples up and across the characters’ grim faces, recalling the dungeon lantern at Wentworth that burned the petition of complaint.

Later, the blue flashes of fireworks suggest a lightning storm, an adapted trope of the horror and mystery genres, portending the personal and political conflicts to come. Overall, the wavering light and partnering shadows convey the instability and changing visibility of characters’ circumstances and footing. Danger and fear dominate the emotional landscape.

Fire, both literal and figurative, shares lighting’s importance in the scene’s multiple meanings. The hearth and fireworks displays mirror the heat in these characters’ lives—past, present, and future. Burning anger (Claire, Murtagh), documents (Petition of Complaint), tongues (Claire, Murtagh), lungs (Alex), and a past of burned-out body and soul (Jamie) all clash with the Duke’s arrogant coolness.

Sandringham’s appearance lights the fuse that burns for nearly seven minutes until the literal, external explosions of the festivities and the figurative, internal explosion of Claire’s sense of security. All the bottled anger and restraint leading up to that moment find release not in revenge against the Duke for his treachery but in Claire’s loss of composure and vanquished silence.

The uses of light and fire all culminate in the threat of destruction to our protagonists, and the last shot focusing on the fireworks drives the point home as the music rises in ironic Baroque playfulness.

0_fireworks_ep202_finalscene

One could go so far as to say that the light, the fireworks, and the music all belong to the triumphant villains of the scene—the wily chameleon in the Duke of Sandringham and the specter of a living devil, Captain Jonathan Wolverton “Black Jack” Randall. They emerge untouchable, the Duke with the psychological victory over Claire Fraser and the captain with his affirmed existence yet absence from the scene.

The resulting cliffhanger suspense at the terminus of such a complex, neatly packed, visually delicious, and dramatic episode brings the viewer back for more without hesitation.

Photo credits: All images by STARZ and Sony Pictures Television, accessed at Outlander-Online.


For my full review of episodes 201 and 202, including commentary on other individual performances, visit “Outlander STARZ, Season 2 Review: Episodes 201 and 202.”

Only one of countless examples of TV storytelling the show aces, the final scene of ep202 foreshadows several events in the series. I hope the show continues to follow Sandringham’s pivotal role in the book’s plot, giving Simon Callow yet more air time.

Tune in to Starz at 9pm ET on Saturdays to find out. This week the Highlanders reunite and prepare for battle. You can also watch Outlander on demand online via Starz Play. As a stand-out episode, I highly recommend ep207, “Faith,” which first aired two weeks ago and presents a dramatic turning point in the season, featuring mind-blowing work by Caitriona Balfe as Claire Fraser.

And there’s so much more to come. This week, World Outlander Day (June 1), the 25th anniversary of the first book’s publication, brought us the gift of the official announcement that not one but two more seasons–3 and 4–will go forward. Hooray!

Long live Outlander. “Je suis pret.”