Five-Phrase Friday (34): Earth Day, Every Day

So did you carry around a poem in your pocket all day yesterday and share it with others? Wonderful! I didn’t, but I did present my own poem for review at my writers group.

For this blog’s “Wild Verses: Bits of Nature Poetry” series last summer, showcasing excerpts of my original work, I shared two bits of the poem “If I Had Known” in the first and the seventh post out of ten.

For Earth Day, enjoy five more lines from “If I Had Known” that focus on the predator-prey relationships of wildlife:

that kills can be as bold as water-cat jaguar

spiking alligator-cousin caiman, skull to brain,

with fangs longer than the face seems to fit, 

and

that fauna form peculiar teams, mixing . . .  

in mutual defense and pack-style attack

copyright C. L. Tangenberg


Here, kitty, kitty . . .

jaguar

Photobucket.com stock image

Wild Verses: Bits of Nature Poetry, 7 of 10

A second excerpt from the first poem of this series, the free verse piece “If I Had Known,” this stanza starts the poem. See the first sample here.

that the sea floor can be
a negative of the night sky,
each dark sea star sprinkled 
among friends in irregular constellations
on the white sand carpet, blurring black, 
fusing as one, when shadowy alien rays 
flap and glide overhead;

copyright C. L. Tangenberg

Wild Verses: Bits of Nature Poetry, 1 of 10

From my poem “If I Had Known,” finished April 2013:

How could I think ice is anything but alive, 
be duped by the same deception as living coral,
calcifying architecture, fanned like some ghost
town cascading down the hillside, fixed in place
but all the while eating, growing, breeding?

copyright C. L. Tangenberg