The Glens Trail, Gorge Metro Park

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On May 13, 2017, between my mother’s birthday and Mother’s Day, the husband and I ventured out on a trail in our area to hike and explore for the first time—and what a discovery!

We could almost claim the Glens Trail of Gorge Metro Park for ourselves on that beautiful spring Saturday. Although the parking lot was packed, few locals seem to realize how the Glens’ beauty matches or exceeds that of the Gorge Trail.

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How could we be ignorant of this treasure so nearby?

The park resides in the city limits of Cuyahoga Falls, our former hometown of seven years and the place where both my parents grew up. Aunts, uncles, and their siblings, my folks, came to know the area well during the 50s and 60s.

Back then, I daresay, the natural beauty of the Gorge was taken for granted. To our predecessors, it was just another close place of recreation in which to pass idle childhood moments. They had no idea how unique this playground was.

Its danger, however, became all too familiar to one family member, who shall remain anonymous. Playing hooky from school one day with a friend, this relative fell nearly 100 feet down into the Gorge. We think it was somewhere along this section of the Cuyahoga River bank, if not on what is now the Glens Trail itself.

The friend thought our family member was dead, but luck, providence, or fate would have it that the landing was mercifully soft, though not far from a treacherous boulder. No major head trauma, no broken bones. A bona fide miracle. Next time, there would be no skipping school at the Gorge—only in much safer places.

Nothing so dramatic but the view accompanied our virgin visit to the trail. Although the going wasn’t easy, we know from experience it was easier than if we had taken the Gorge Trail, which is much more vertical, narrower, and rougher. The Glens Trail is almost 2 miles long, out and back; the return is on the same path.

Looking at the park map before arriving, I had expected a lower elevation, riverbed sort of trail. I think we were both pleasantly surprised by the scenic geology and dense greenery.

The Glens Trail runs parallel to the Cuyahoga River, but the trees made river views rare. With daylight waning, most water we could see was either frothed with white foam, trickling from a pipe atop the opposite bank, or more brown than blue from steady current through a shallow river, with its silty sedimentary bed and some urban contamination.

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Investigating the sediment content online led me to learn more about the geologic history of the area. The main features combine shale, sandstone, and conglomerate rock layers.

Most of northeast Ohio is built on Bedford Shale (most easily eroded) overlain by Berea Sandstone (evident at Glens Trail).

The Sharon Conglomerate came later and is the most erosion resistant of the three layers. The best examples of this occur in parks and trails with the word Ledges in their names.

But I also found this note: The most accessible location to view Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks, including the Sharon Conglomerate, is in Gorge Park, part of the Metro Parks, Serving Summit County system.” Source: “Bedrock Beneath” at Green City Blue Lake, The Cleveland Museum of Natural History

With glaciation, erosion, damming, pollution, restoration, and now talk of removing certain dams, the Cuyahoga Valley has undergone many changes over the millennia.

The map: Cuyahoga River

The height and sheer faces of the cliffs are breathtaking, an unexpected feature of the trek that made us slow down and look around more than we might have otherwise.

An orphaned slab made way for a partial cave roof that appears to have been used, perhaps centuries ago, for shelter. A soot stain on the “ceiling” suggests repeated fires.

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Birds were plentiful for an afternoon, due to the secluded, protected nature of the trail. We spotted catbird, sparrows, red-winged blackbirds, robins, cardinals, and Canada goose, among others, along with a kind of swallow I’m still not sure of.

I think I’ve narrowed it down to either a bank swallow or a tree swallow. By name, a cliff or cave swallow would make more sense, as it was perched on rock outside a nest in the cliff crevice, but colorings and territory ruled those out. Bank swallows usually nest in colonies in sandy hillside holes, whereas tree swallows nest singly in trees or cavities.

It may have been a juvenile or female tree swallow orIMG_1684_swallow a bank swallow taking its home where it could. As you can probably see, the picture is blurry, so the starker lines between the tree swallow’s blue-green head cap, back, and wings versus white throat, belly, and under tail may have been smudged more softly together. Really, I was lucky to capture its image at all.

“Angry” bird: Robin flings debris in search of food or nesting material.

There were a few narrow parts where ducking was in order and some uneven ground to manage, including hills, but the views, especially of the rocks on our left going out, were well worth the effort. The drop-off is steep, but it’s steeper on the other side of the river.

From the parking lot up the hill at 1160 Front Street, Cuyahoga Falls, visitors have central access to three major trails at Gorge Metro Park, Summit County, Ohio: Glens, Gorge, and Highbridge.

Next time, we’ll try out the Highbridge Trail. Another moderate path, but almost twice as long as the Glens, it should be manageable with sufficient time. Directly opposite the Gorge Trail along the river, Highbridge goes roughly west. Glens goes roughly east.

Although the Gorge is the rock star of the park, the Glens Trail, wandering away alone, also deserves a second look.


Happy trails to you this summer, wherever you find yourself.

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Backyard Brief, May 2016

The red-winged blackbirds have grown bold and frequent in their visits. I counted two males at once about the feeders this morning. I keep singing the Beatles–“Blackbird singing in the dead of night . . .”–and recalling Wallace Stevens’ poem “13 Ways of Looking at a Blackbird.” There is something magical about them. And that distinctive call; I hear it, grab the camera and go hunting.

Another visitor of late seems to be a female or juvenile chipping sparrow. She has a barred or striped breast, and the stripe over the top edge of her eye distinguishes her from the house sparrow riff-raff. Pig birds, I call them. Numerous and sloppy in their feasting. The chipper’s beak is too narrow to be a house finch female’s. I’ll try to snap a shot of it. It was something like this:

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Image credit: Brian E. Small. Audubon.org

I had hoped the suet feeder would attract at least that one remaining woodpecker I keep hearing throttle in the woods across the street, or a white-breasted nuthatch, but so far, no luck. The starlings, usually in flocks, have started coming around for the suet, along with the red-winged blackbirds and the grackles. Even the robins have ventured upwards from the worm-rich yard. The flying pigs, of course, will go for it as well.

Resident mourning dove pairs, two of them: They sit in the grass or the flower bed beneath the dogwood, relaxing but with wary black eyes. They are relentless in seeking out leftovers.

The diminutive goldfinches are few, but their feeder is large. I keep hoping for a flock. Even one is a treat to me. Too bad I broke my CJ Wildlife mug with the American goldfinch and sunflower on it the other day. I’ll have to order more.

Patches of red come in the form of house finches and cardinals.

I spotted a dark-eyed junco a couple of times in early April.

Black-capped chickadees darted in and out in March, but I’ve seen none since. I did change the birdseed. Perhaps a return to the previous variety. . . .

Interestingly, no squirrels or chipmunks yet, though I’m sure the nocturnal rabbits are active.

Barn and tree swallows were snatching bugs low across the grass at the Silver Springs soccer field yesterday for my niece’s game. Canada geese flew overhead, and the red-winged blackbirds abound in the reeds beside the field.

So, let’s see, the spring tally for the backyard so far:

  1. red-winged blackbirds – 2
  2. chipping sparrow (?) – 1
  3. house sparrows – so many, they hardly count
  4. starlings – 5 or more
  5. grackles – 2
  6. American robin – up to 3
  7. mourning doves – 4
  8. goldfinches – 4
  9. house finches – 6 or more
  10. cardinals – a couple of pairs
  11. dark-eyed junco – 1
  12. black-capped chickadee – 1 or 2

That’s quite a few different species! Upwards of 50 individuals.

It brings a smile–and lots of droppings, but I’ve got it covered.

We planted a serviceberry tree (Amelanchier canadensis) at the dog’s grave on Saturday. The berries should pop out in summer. For now, after the drench of the past few days, some delicate white flower bunches, like little balls of popcorn, remain. The tree is about 8 feet tall. Autumn should bring red and gold foliage.

Forget-me-not seeds will nestle soon there, too. Rest in peace and beauty, bird dog.