Scotland Ventured, Scotland Gained

October 10, 2016

We’re back! Stay tuned for upcoming posts on things like driving stories, travel tips, restaurant, lodging and attraction reviews, Outlander tour ideas, whiskey (whisky) sampling results, favorite close-ups and vistas, Gaelic language lessons, pleasant surprises, and oodles of images from two weeks spent exploring the land of Scots and so much more.

Alba gu brath!


November 2016 update: Posts of our Scotland excursion are linked below, through the far-right, top-menu tab “Scotland,” and on the Philosofishal home page.

Before the trip:

  1. Book Review: Fodors Travel Essential Great Britain
  2. The Labor of Learning to Set Limits
  3. Five-Phrase Friday (38): Scotland

After the trip:

  1. Morning Fog, Loch Long, Arrochar – snapshot from the Seabank B&B, Trossachs National Park (posted Oct 11, 2016)
  2. Scottish Color: A Photo Essay – overview of sensory highlights (posted Oct 12, 2016)
  3. The Paps of Jura – sea-and-mountains vista; language lesson (posted Oct 15, 2016)
  4. Linlithgow Palace, a.k.a. Wentworth Prison – profile of a lesser-known Outlander STARZ filming site (posted Oct 20, 2016)
  5. Famous Poets’ Nature Poetry, 5: Of Mice, Men and Rabbie Burns – reading “To a Mouse” & The Writers’ Museum (posted Oct 24, 2016)
  6. Kurdish in Edinburgh – restaurant review (posted Nov 4, 2016)
  7. Dial up the sun – original poem & photos from the National Museum of Scotland (posted Nov 9, 2016)
  8. An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 1 – my take on Outlander tourism, presenting filming sites in Central Scotland (posted December 1, 2016)
  9. An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 2 – continuing in Central Scotland with filming sites in Glasgow, then southward to the Ayrshire coast and Dumfries & Galloway (posted December 23, 2016)
  10. An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 3 – wrapping up orientation with sites in the Highlands, from Perthshire to Ross & Cromarty to Inverness (posted Feb 11, 2017)
  11. An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 4 – the story of my trip planning process, snapshots of planned vs. actual itinerary, summary of our experience, and reflections on improvements (posted March 11, 2017)
  12. Wildlife TV Programs This Week – a heads-up for Wild Scotland on NatGeoWild. See the end section about select Scotland nature and wildlife tourism options with brief descriptions and links to resources. (posted March 27, 2017)
  13. Review: Slainte Scotland Outlander Tour + Outlander Tourism Resources – (a.k.a. part 5) our Outlander tour and Slainte Scotland company review, notes on OL sites we visited alone, profiles of most popular OL filming sites, list of 40 OL filming sites, resources for OL book and inspiration sites, other OL tour company links, articles on the show, plus how to survive Droughtlander (posted April 11, 2017)
  14. An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 6, the final post in the OL tourism series, focused on Scottish and more general travel tips and resources, based on our Scotland trip experiences (posted June 15, 2017)

Updated June 2017 – lined-out items appear in “An Outlander Tourist in Scotland, Part 6″:

  • B&B, hotel & transport reviews
  • travel apps I liked (& those I didn’t)
  • my whisky tasting report
  • Inverness dining delights

Celebrating Alba – candidates for what’s next:

  • Argyll with OL‘s Àdhamh Ó Broin
  • the Scotland driving experience
  • Cawdor Castle up close
  • Edinburgh down “close”
  • our Jacobite Steam Train ride
  • Sueno’s (Pictish) Stone, Forres
  • a great Edinburgh Castle visit
  • Tomnahurich Cemetery Hill, a fairy hill
  • monuments, museums, galleries
  • Moray Firth coastal exploring
  • vistas and secrets of Glen Coe
  • what not to miss at Stirling Castle
  • Fairy Glen on the Black Isle
  • National Museum of Scottish Football

Five-Phrase Friday (30): British Invasion

Now that St. Patrick’s Day is over, and you’re ready for some post-hangover learning, bring on the Brits!

Relations between Great Britain (UK) and the United States have been described as being between “two societies separated by a common language,” implying the difficulties we have in understanding each other when using the same words (homonyms) that have different meanings on either side of the pond.

Even agreement over the word “English” can be a tricky proposition. There’s American English (we’ll set aside its diversity for now), British English, Irish English, Scots English, Welsh English, and many more in between. It is debatable, I suppose, to call Geordie a form of British English, but references call it a dialect. Whichever “dialect,” or version, you consider to be true “English English” or “proper English” may inevitably depend upon which one you speak.

One way or another, though, as I said in post 28, ultimately it comes down to communication and common understanding. If we are to bring an attitude of respect to each other’s lands, then efforts toward this common understanding are paramount.

As an American, Briticisms you might come across while preparing for a UK vacay, especially in London or other large cities, include:

  1. bespoke apparel (adj.) = custom-made clothes. This term frequently describes famed or historic high-end tailoring houses, department stores, and royal shops in London, England. For Americans, it seems to be simply a quaint, archaic adjective, if not utterly foreign. British fictional characters might use it, but surely not real people.
  2. an arcade (n.) = a shopping mall or plaza. It gets its name from the use of arches in the architecture of the building. Our most familiar use of this term in the States refers to the video game arcades of decades past. Example: Burlington Arcade in London.
  3. a circus (n.) = a rounded open space in a town or city where several streets converge; a prime example: Piccadilly Circus. After all, it would be inaccurate to call it a square. The USA simply doesn’t have as many circular public spaces as the Old World does. (Brits have the other type of circus for entertainment as well.) Source: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/circus
  4. a parade (n.) = a public promenade, square or street of shops. Example: Horse Guards Parade, ” large parade ground off Whitehall in central London, England. . . . It is the site of the annual ceremonies of Trooping the Colour, which commemorates the monarch’s official birthday.” Again, another meaning is the event or activity of parading. Football (soccer) stadiums in England might also be named as some proprietor’s parade. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse_Guards_Parade
  5. a hamper-style meal (n.) = In the UK, a hamper is “a basket or box containing food for a special occasion.” Although Americans might expect food to come out of the laundry, a hamper-style meal in Britain is similar to the American picnic basket or boxed lunch. A portable repast. Source: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/hamper

COVERLONDONGUIDEPRINT

I drew my inspiration from the writing style and examples in the special-issue magazine London 2016 Guide, published by The Chelsea Magazine Company Ltd and sponsored by Britain Magazine.

The guide is a useful collection of up-to-the-moment tips and insights for tourists of England’s capital this year. The art is high quality and enticing, and its advertisements reveal hidden treasures and specialized interests that may not have made the top lists featured in “Capital Views” or “101 Days Out,” which presents site lists based on theme. I particularly appreciated the “Literature Lovers” section on page 80 of that article. I’ve been enjoying my perusal of the guide as my husband and I plan our UK jaunt.

If you’ve been reading my other posts, you’ll know I’m a huge fan of the Outlander books and TV series, which is one of the major sparks for our planning this trip–Scotland. However, I figured, lest I get carried away booking Scottish stops, as an English teacher, I had better remember and learn more about the many reasons for visiting England. As I’ve been doing that, I’m wishing we only had more time to cover it all. It’s looking as though we’ll have to skip Ireland (sorry St. Paddy! and Mom) and Wales altogether for this, our first-ever trip to the United Kingdom.

By the way, if you missed all the fun with puns, see last week’s post or the small-town slogans in Five-Phrase Friday (7).

Five-Phrase Friday (19): In My Loving Arts

For the end of the year, and to make up for posting late (well, it was Christmas Day, after all), I’ve collected a year-end finale of five sets of five pop culture things I love. Usually represented in the form of a phrase, these are only samples of the many objects of my admiration. So here they are in no particular order.

I. Five titles of some of the most endearing Scottish folk songs Bear McCreary uses in the Outlander Starz TV Season One Original ScoreSheet_music_comin_thru_the_rye_duckduckgo_photostock

  1. “Comin’ Thro’ the Rye,” which supports at least three different scenes in the series
  2. “Maids, When You’re Young Never Wed an Old Man” – in two different scenes and speeds: Jamie’s drunken evening and Jamie’s hangover the next morning, both in ep112 “Lallybroch”
  3. “My Bonnie Moorhen” in Jenny and Claire’s part of ep114 “The Search”
  4. “Weel May the Keel Ro” – described by composer Bear McCreary as a “fun jig” for the first part of Claire and Murtagh’s search in the same episode
  5. “Sleepy Maggie” – for the up-tempo rescue  sequence in ep116 “To Ransom a Man’s Soul”

II. Five of the novels I have most enjoyed (that I hadn’t already read)

since early 2011:

  1. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green – 4/5
  2. 1984 by George Orwell – 4/5
  3. Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner – 4/5
  4. Drums of Autumn by Diana Gabaldon (4th novel in the Outlander series) – 4/5
  5. In Cold Blood by Truman Capote – 5/5

III. Five favorite movies I have seen recently (I’ve got lots to catch up on, especially from 2014):

  1. Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens – 5/5
  2. Still Alice – 4/5
  3. The Martian – 4/5
  4. Spy – 4/5
  5. Guardians of the Galaxy – 4/5

IV. Five of my favorite alternative music hits from 2015 – heard on SiriusXM’s AltNation:

  1. “Trip Switch” by Nothing But Thieves
  2. “Leave a Trace” by Chvrches
  3. “First” by Cold War Kids
  4. “Sedona” by Houndmouth
  5. “Now” by Joywave

V. Five of my new favorite TV shows (not necessarily new shows–in order to have a life, I’ve limited my exposure):

  1. Outlander
  2. Penny Dreadful
  3. Archer
  4. Parks and Recreation
  5. the prospect of watching Netflix shows one day, as well as Orphan Black, The Americans, and season two of Outlander

I hope you are counting your diverse blessings, too, and that they number well over 25, as mine do. I wish you all the best in 2016. Now and always, may the phrases be with you.

Five-Phrase Friday (13): Eerie Emily

On the 13th of the month! This week, I’m doubling back on the Emily Dickinson quotes and renewing a little Halloween spirit, if for no other reason than it’s far too soon to be stringing up Christmas lights (next-door neighbor! #LetTheTurkeyCool), and because it works. Dickinson had a knack for the morbid. See Five-Phrase Friday (2) for the first round featuring her unique turns of phrase.

1. "a tighter breathing and zero at the bone" 
               - from "A Narrow Fellow in the Grass"

2. "in horrid-hooting stanza"
               - from "I Like to See It Lap the Miles"

3. "a druidic difference"
               - from "Further in Summer Than the Birds"

4. "on whom I lay a yellow eye" 
               - from "My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun"

5. "I heard a fly buzz when I died"
               - from "I Heard a Fly Buzz When I Died"

Note the personification of the train in the title of 2, the subsequent line being “and lick the valleys up.” Metaphors also abound in Dickinson’s work. One of the more interesting ones is her equating of life and a loaded gun.

Until next week, enjoy resisting the holiday season!

Five-Phrase (Freaky!) Friday (11): Band Mash-ups

You have now entered the fun house that is Five-Phrase (Freaky!) Friday, Number 11. Proceed with bug eyes and funny bones as we explore the world of shape shifting, mutant hybrids, and murderous intentions–in words and phrases, that is.

Last week, I foretold of a unique linguistic phenomenon exemplified by the word “readaholic.” Like “shopaholic” and “workaholic”–but not like “alcoholic”–this type of word is known as a portmanteau. Pronounced PORT – man – TOE.

French for “(it) carries (the) cloak,” the word portmanteau’s original use was to describe a type of suitcase that opens into two halves. In linguistic terms, a portmanteau is the joining of two words to make a completely new word from only part of each of the original two.

The compound noun, by contrast, contains two words that have remained intact from their original states. An example would be the word “doghouse.” The two words in a standard compound noun are like buddies joined at the hip, whereas a portmanteau is that set of conjoined twins who share vital organs. Freaky. . . .

Designer dog breeds are a place where we often see this happen: Labradoodle (Labrador + poodle) and puggle (pug + beagle), for instance. Although not conjoined twins, designer dogs are genuine animal hybrids, assuming they come from a reputable breeder.

The Internet, cell phones, and social networking have spawned other creatures such as sexting (sex + texting) and, of course, blog (web + log) and vlog (video + log).

Food-related examples of portmanteaus further illustrate this melding effect:

cheeseburger = cheese + hamburger

spork = spoon + fork

the kids’ breakfast cereal (Count) Chocula = chocolate + Dracula

zombilicious = zombie + delicious

A portmanteau can be a delightful outcome of linguistic invention and creative word play–or a source of great annoyance to language purists, and confusing to people just trying to keep up with regular English.

So that’s the world of portmanteaus in a . . . suitcase.

Now, for our feature freak show, . . .

This week’s five phrases are gerund-based names of music bands with a Halloween feel. Each band name’s first word is a gerund (pron. JAIR – und), an -ing ending verb form that acts as a noun, specifically an action:

Counting Crows

Flogging Molly

(The) Smashing Pumpkins *

Stabbing Westward

Talking Heads

What are some other gerund-y band names you’re familiar with?

Can you think of movie, TV show, book, or song titles that begin with or contain gerunds?

Beware of the overuse of gerunds (a habit of mine), running into vampire worlds, butterfly-winged bullets, Mr. Jones’ strange luggage, sharp cutlery, jack-o’-lantern vandals, devilish dance floors, psycho killers, weapon-toting trick-or-treaters, green knights, headless horsemen, portmanteau experiments gone awry, bad music, and bad grammar–but not witches; witches are okay–while you have a . . .

. . . Happy Halloween!

Protect the great pumpkins and phrases.

And I’ll see you in November–National Novel Writing Month!


  • Number 3 has been known as both “The Smashing Pumpkins” and “Smashing Pumpkins.” When presented along with the article “the,” the word “smashing” becomes an adjective modifying the noun “pumpkins.” As in, they were a “smashing success,” which they were.

Five-Phrase Friday (9): “Slings and Arrows…”

“. . . of outrageous fortune!” (Hamlet, the “To be, or not to be” speech): These we suffer.

First, let me say this week’s English phrase celebration covers all of my blog’s major focus areas: language play, animals, Outlander, free speech, reading, comedy, poetry, grammar, creativity, education, TV, and even Shakespeare! This post has it all–something for each reader. So enjoy!

Ordinarily I don’t condone name-calling, even in jest (unless you really know that the person can take it). But since it’s William Shakespeare we’re talking about, and since many words he used in his insults have fallen into disuse lately, what the heck! Let’s have some fun.

This week’s phrase-praising post deals in threes by looking at (1) bawdy insults featured in Shakespeare’s plays, (2) Outlander TV show insults identified by episode, and (3) a review of Five-Phrase Friday grammar lessons–your favorite!

Several online sources deal with Shakespearean insult creation, but MIT provides a succinct set of lists in three columns for your three-step, mix-and-match pleasure. They call it the Shakespearean Insult Kit.

How it works: Take an adjective from column 1, one from column 2, and a noun from column 3, put them together, and ‘zounds! Your own tailor-made Shakespearean insult.

This week’s collection of phrases comprise some of my favorite bawdy-leaning combinations from the kit.

Grammar Alert! Hey, look at that. Did you notice in that sentence the omnipresent type of word highlighted in previous Five-Phrase Friday (FPF) posts? FPF 4 and FPF 6 use or mention it, and FPF 8 uses it in one of the featured phrases. I’ve mentioned before that I tend to use a lot of these in my writing, especially my poetry. Final hint: This grammatical element shows up every week in another way as well.

Now, as for these insults, delivery is key. Each line must be shouted or growled aloud, convey real or mock anger/disgust at the target (be it animate or not), and follow the word “Thou” or “You,” just as one might with modern-day provoked and provocative name-calling. Relish the triumvirate of insulting results:

1. “Thou beslubbering reeling-ripe strumpet!”

2. “Thou mewling rump-fed codpiece!”

3. “Thou ruttish swag-bellied lewdster!”

4. “Thou frothy guts-griping pignut!”

5. “Thou gleeking knotty-pated canker-blossom!”

Bonus #1: “You cockered sheep-biting moldwarp!”

Bonus #2: “You spongy pox-marked nut-hook!”

Okay, now shake it off if you felt any of that being directed at you, go to the MIT kit, and fire back with gusto! (I can take it, I promise.)

With a nod to wild(and domesticated)life, other words I like in the kit use animals in part or whole:

bat-fowling, goatish, barnacle, beetle-headed, boar-pig, bugbear, currish, coxcomb, flap-dragon, flirt-gill, fly-bitten, harpy, hedge-pig, horn-beast, maggot-pie, malt-worm, pigeon-egg, ratsbane, venomed, toad-spotted, wagtail

Oooh, I like that last combo: “You venomed toad-spotted wagtail!” Or how about “Thou currish beetle-headed ratsbane!”? Now that’s a hybrid mutant!

Grammar Note: You may notice in some of these a type of word similar to the one hinted at above in the “Grammar Alert!” These words from column or group 3 fall distinctly into the noun category. What is the name for this type of noun?

And how are these insults typically used? Some high schools and colleges use exercises with these examples in English class units on Shakespeare to help students read the Bard’s works with greater awareness of the comedy, more fun, and, thus, more positive motivation. I divided one of my classes into two teams for a shouting match once–very funny! (I wonder what our extreme PC college culture has done to this tradition.)

Also, my favorite TV show Outlander demonstrates the use of similar insulting words, sampled here in tripartite order for your experimental three-step dance:

clarty (ep105)
mendacious (ep109)
muckle (ep112/ep114)
rutting (ep108, ep109)

ill-formed (ep115)
foul-mouthed (ep109)
stripe-backed (ep109)
whey-faced (ep105)

bugger (ep107)
coof (ep107)
scold (ep109)
welp (ep110)

For an invented example, the melange “You muckle whey-faced coof!” samples one word each in order from ep112 “Lallybroch”/ep114 “The Search,” ep105 “Rent,” and ep107 “The Wedding.”

Of course, our protagonist Claire prefers her own 20th-century insults not fit for general consumption, and then there’s all that Scottish Gaelic stuff. . . . All in good time.

Do you Outlander fans know which character(s) spoke each word in the insult? Quiz next week.

No, really. Next Friday I’ll (1) confirm the character and scene for each word in the above insult, (2) present select lines from Outlander for my phrases, and (3) unveil the answers to today’s 2 word-type questions.

For those who just can’t get enough 18th-century Scottish/English epithets and lewdness, curse your way over to either of these Outlander-related posts on my blog:

By the way, you can vote for your favorite movies, music, TV shows, and players for the People’s Choice Awards 2016 starting this week.

Cheers, you itinerant pretty-minded logophiles!

Five-Phrase Friday (8): Simile, Metaphor and Mood

Welcome to Five-Phrase Friday, a weekly spotlight on English phrases I enjoy. This week we revisit poetic turns of phrase with a random selection of gems that demonstrate ways to write about birds, the sea, and sex, and how to group unexpected ideas together.

From these passages alone, can you detect the mood of each poem?

Do you recall the difference between simile and metaphor? Can you spot one of each?

1. "in profuse strains of unpremeditated art"
     - "To a Skylark" by Percy Shelley

2. "wine-dark sea"
     - The Iliad of Homer 
       (his legendary status merits the change in preposition)

3. "and be simple to myself as the bird is to the bird"
     - "Birds" by Judith Wright

4. "sailing toward the iceberg of her nakedness"
     - "Taking Off Emily Dickinson's Clothes" by Billy Collins

5. "hair, glacier, flashlight"
     - "A Valediction Forbidding Mourning" by Adrienne Rich

Great phrases often point to great larger works. I encourage you to read the whole poems–and poetry collections–whence these snippets arise. Hmm… Seems I’m feeling a little Elizabethan, or at least archaic (surprise, surprise). Maybe next time I’ll feature bawdy Shakespearean insults. What do you think?

For passages of poetry from previous posts (hey, that’s how it came out), see Five-Phrase Friday (1) and Five-Phrase Friday (2).

Free your phrases this week. Word.