To a Haggis on Burns Night

It’s Burns Night, the traditional celebration of the birth of Robert Burns, Scotland’s most iconic poet. Often with a traditional Scottish meal, songs, and poetry reading, Burns Night is celebrated across the Scottish diaspora every year on January 25th.

Although I won’t be partaking in a Scottish meal (though I do love me some haggis . . . not really; it’s okay, but I prefer black pudding), I celebrate by sharing with you excerpts from Burns’ poem “Address to a Haggis,” written in 1787.

Related posts on this blog involving Robert Burns’ poetry, language translation, and definitions include:

As with those posts, I have done my best to add word meanings below for the Scots terms. Again I used the Dictionary of the Scots Language as my source.

However, dear students and enthusiasts, I leave you to analyze the first section of this haggis poem to your hearts’ content. Enjoy its text in full through, for example, the link found in a 2017 article about Burns Night from International Business Times. My primary source for the text of the poem is The Complete Poems and Songs of Robert Burns, a gift I received last year.

Address to a Haggis

Opening 3 stanzas

Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face,
Great chieftain o’ the pudding-race!
Aboon them a’ yet tak your place,
                        Painch, tripe, or thairm:
Weel are ye wordy o’ a grace
                        As lang’s my arm.

fa’ (v.) – fall
sonsie (adj.) – good, honest, lucky (said esp. of women)
Aboon (prep.) – above, higher than
a’ (pron.) – all
tak (v.) – take
painch (n.) – paunch, belly, stomach
tripe (n., adj.) – tall, thin, ungainly person; slovenly, gangling
thairm (n.) – gut or bowel
weel (adj.) – well
wordy (v.) – worthy
grace (n.) – grace-drink, taken at the end of a meal after grace is said
lang (adj.) – long

The groaning trencher there ye fill,
Your hurdies like a distant hill,
Your pin wad help to mend a mill
                       In time o’ need,
While thro’ your pores the dews distil
                       Like amber bead.

trencher (n.) – round or square plate or platter of wood or metal (i.e., flatware)
hurdies (n.pl.) – buttocks, hips, haunches of humans and animals
wad (v.) – would

His knife see rustic Labour dight,
An’ cut you up wi’ ready sleight,
Trenching your gushing entrails bright,
                        Like onie ditch;
And then, O what a glorious sight,
                        Warm-reekin’, rich!

dight (v.) – clothe, deck or adorn
onie (adj.) – any
reekin’ (adj.) – reeking

The next 3 stanzas share delicious language about competing for a portion of the food, defying foreigners to disdain their feast, and the unpleasant consequences after supper awaiting those who ate too well.

The last 2 stanzas frolic with the feaster as he makes his bloated way home until at last we see the final statement of haggis’s superiority to other refreshments, such as porridge and milk.

But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
The trembling earth resounds his tread,
Clap in his walie nieve a blade,
                         He’ll make it whissle;
An’ legs an’ arms, an’ hands will sned,
                         Like taps o’ thrissle.

walie (adj.) – fine, excellent; big, strong
nieve (n.) – fist, grip
whissle (v.) – spend? (as in explode?)
sned (v.) – chop (off)
taps (n.pl.) – tufts, as of bird crest feathers
thrissle (n.) – thistle

Ye Pow’rs wha mak mankind your care,
And dish them out their bill o’ fare,
Auld Scotland wants nae skinking ware
                        That jaups in luggies;
But, if ye wish her gratefu’ prayer,
                        Gie her a haggis!

wha (pron.) – who
mak (v.) – make
auld (adj.) – old
nae (adj.) – no
skinking (adj.) – pouring, pitcher
jaups (v.) – dash, splash, ripple
luggies (n.pl.) – small wooden dishes or vessels used in serving milk, porridge
gie (v.) – give
haggis (n.) – “A dish consisting of the pluck or heart, lungs and liver of a sheep minced and mixed with suet, oatmeal, onion and seasoning and boiled in a sheep’s maw or stomach.” (also used as an insult, a term of contempt for a person – blockhead, stupid)

And so, what is Burns Night to a haggis? Complete annihilation.


For a recipe and more information, see “What Is Haggis Made of?” at The Spruce Eats. Of course, Burns Night isn’t complete without bagpipes and whisky. Nae bother, we’ll be better organized by next January.

Happy Burns Night–and weekend. . . .

Speaking of weeks and ends, catch the Season 4 finale of Outlander, Sunday, January 27, at 8pm Eastern on STARZ. Episodes guide here.

Traditional haggis. Photo credit Reuters via International Business Times, UK, 2017.

Primary References

Dictionary of the Scots Language. / Dictionar o the Scots Leid. (n.d.). A database supported by the Scottish Government and hosted by the University of Glasgow. Retrieved from http://www.dsl.ac.uk/

Waverley Books. (2011). The Complete Poems and Songs of Robert Burns. Glasgow: The Gresham Publishing Company Ltd. pp. 194-195.

April is National Poetry Month

Small-Blue-RGB-National-Poetry-Month-Logo_0

It’s time to celebrate! Let us count the ways . . . .

  • Download, print and display this year’s poster.
  • List and find your group’s or area’s poetry-related events.
  • Attend a poetry open mic or poetry slam event.
  • Put on your poetry-writing contest face for the local library or calls for poems from literary and news publications.
  • Learn how to read and study poetry like a pro!
  • Track down and read the work of that poet you keep hearing about.
  • Students and teachers, check out Poetry 180, the Library of Congress project of former U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins.
  • Learn about the national recitation contest Poetry Out Loud.
  • Empty your pockets so they may be blessed with the bounty of beautiful verse on April 21, Poem-in-Your-Pocket Day.
  • Get out and poeticize (it’s a word, I swear! poets can make up words, too) nature, politics, facebook, school, the arts, work, your wardrobe, jelly beans, your car, that bad hair day, dust bunnies, March Madness, tattoos gone wrong–whatever!
  • Pen a song, write a rap, craft a poetic recipe, or make your own poetry crossword puzzle.
  • And if you’re ready to publish, check out guides such as 2016 Poet’s Market.

Worship words, savor sounds, lather up your language, make music, praise poetry.

Gear up for the verses.

Access all the awesomeness!

#rhymingoptional


Here are my blog’s 10 top-viewed posts in poetry.

  1. Adapted Bawdy Lyrics: Outlander TV Series, Episode 114, “The Search”
  2. Scotland’s Burns and Outlander rival Shakespeare’s bawdy
  3. Nature Poetry by Famous Poets
  4. Wild Verses, 5 of 10 / Writing 201: Poetry, Day 1 (Haiku, Water, Simile)
  5. Famous Poets’ Nature Poetry, 3: Wordsworth’s Daffodils
  6. Call of the Wild Poetry
  7. Famous Poets’ Nature Poetry, 2: Elizabeth Bishop
  8. Famous Poets’ Nature Poetry, 1a: “The Sunlight on the Garden”
  9. On Process: Verse Writing. Introduction and Part I: Motivation (involves writing an elegy for the late, great Leonard Nimoy/Spock)
  10. Writing 201: Poetry, Day 2 (Limerick, Journey, Alliteration)

Originally posted March 21st, International Day of Poetry, as “Poetry Month–It’s Coming!”

Poetry Month–It’s Coming!

Small-Blue-RGB-National-Poetry-Month-Logo_0

April is National Poetry Month, time to celebrate. Let us count the ways . . . .

  • Download, print and display this year’s poster.
  • List and find your group’s or area’s poetry-related events.
  • Attend a poetry open mic or poetry slam event.
  • Put on your poetry-writing contest face for the local library or calls for poems from literary and news publications.
  • Learn how to read and study poetry like a pro!
  • Track down and read the work of that poet you keep hearing about.
  • Students and teachers, check out Poetry 180, the Library of Congress project of former U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins.
  • Learn about the national recitation contest Poetry Out Loud.
  • Empty your pockets so they may be blessed with the bounty of beautiful verse on April 21, Poem-in-Your-Pocket Day.
  • Get out and poeticize (it’s a word, I swear! poets can make up words, too) nature, politics, facebook, school, the arts, work, your wardrobe, jelly beans, your car, that bad hair day, dust bunnies, March Madness, tattoos gone wrong–whatever!
  • Pen a song, write a rap, craft a poetic recipe, or make your own poetry crossword puzzle.
  • And if you’re ready to publish, check out guides such as 2016 Poet’s Market.

Worship words, savor sounds, lather up your language, make music, praise poetry.

Gear up for the verses.

Access all the awesomeness!

#rhymingoptional


Here are my blog’s 10 top-viewed posts in poetry.

  1. Adapted Bawdy Lyrics: Outlander TV Series, Episode 114, “The Search”
  2. Scotland’s Burns and Outlander rival Shakespeare’s bawdy
  3. Nature Poetry by Famous Poets
  4. Wild Verses, 5 of 10 / Writing 201: Poetry, Day 1 (Haiku, Water, Simile)
  5. Famous Poets’ Nature Poetry, 3: Wordsworth’s Daffodils
  6. Call of the Wild Poetry
  7. Famous Poets’ Nature Poetry, 2: Elizabeth Bishop
  8. Famous Poets’ Nature Poetry, 1a: “The Sunlight on the Garden”
  9. On Process: Verse Writing. Introduction and Part I: Motivation (involves writing an elegy for the late, great Leonard Nimoy/Spock)
  10. Writing 201: Poetry, Day 2 (Limerick, Journey, Alliteration)

 

 

Happy Poem-In-Your-Pocket Day!

Led to it by the episode “Rent” from the Starz TV series Outlander (current screen adaptation of Diana Gabaldon’s novel), I hold in my pocket John Donne’s poem “Present in Absence.”

Claire recites the opening stanza that opens the episode:

ABSENCE, hear thou my protestation
    Against thy strength,
    Distance, and length;
Do what thou canst for alteration:
  For hearts of truest mettle
  Absence doth join, and Time doth settle.

What’s in your pocket?

I hope it has been a versified National Poetry Month for you!


Other Outlander posts on this blog include the following (the first two are closely related):