Outlander STARZ: “Faith” and Patience

As anticipation of Season 3 of Outlander STARZ intensifies, allow me to quote myself from my last reblog of eps 201 and 202 review, published last month to coincide with the start of Season 2’s re-runs this summer:

The ensemble acting, Murtagh’s continued character development and greater centrality than in the books, the Battle of Prestonpans, the use of WWII flashbacks for Claire in “Je Suis Prest” (a great episode), and Rosie Day’s delightfully funny portrayal of Mary Hawkins are just a few of the many treasures to uncover. Then there’s Caitriona Balfe’s performance in ep207 . . . nothing short of phenomenal.

Keep watching Outlander, season 2, Fridays, 9pm EST, on STARZ. But I definitely recommend reading the books, too. 😉

In recent episodes, we’ve met “La Dame Blanche” and a resurrected ghost while “gang a-gley” the “Best-Laid Schemes” of our heroes. It’s time for the second half of Season 2 and some of the best episodes of the season: ep207 “Faith,” ep209 “Je Suis Prest,” ep210 “Prestonpans,” ep211 “Vengeance Is Mine,” ep212 “The Hail Mary,” and the season finale, ep213 “Dragonfly in Amber,” named for the second book on which Season 2 is based.

In ep208 “The Fox’s Lair,” Clive Russell brought excellence as Simon Fraser (“the Old Fox”), Lord Lovat, and Gary Lewis his usual nuance in reprising Colum Mackenzie. However, pacing, structure, and the Laoghaire element dragged it down just enough to remove the episode from top-tier classification. 

But there is plenty more to look forward to in the second half. Simon Callow’s return as the Duke of Sandringham and Lawrence Dobiesz’s performance as Alex Randall prove to be true highlights. Then, there are the intrigues of the war effort led by Bonnie Prince Charlie as Jamie tries to influence its course, some gruesome surgeries Claire must perform, a generally more resolute and strong leader in Jamie Fraser, the introduction of a young Lord John Gray (important to season 3), and several dramatic deaths that shake our main characters to their cores. A little “Faith” truly changes everything.

The season culminates in a 90-minute finale that introduces adult versions of Roger Mackenzie and Brianna Randall while interlacing 1968 scenes with those from 1746, on the morning of the Battle of Culloden.

In case you missed the announcement (what planet are you on, anyway?), Season 3 of Outlander, based on Voyager, Diana Gabaldon’s third and longest book in the series, premieres Sunday, September 10, 2017, on STARZ.

What better way, besides reading the books, to prepare for the return of the show this fall than to re-watch Season 2’s remaining episodes? See them all again through the Outlander STARZ episodes page, if you happened not to purchase the Season 2 DVD set or save the series on your DVR (tsk tsk).

Happy August, Sassenachs. The Droughtlander ends next month!

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Claire and Frank Randall, Boston, 1948. Season 3 image by STARZ/Sony Pictures Television

 

Outlander STARZ: Season 2 Review, Eps 201 and 202

Now that we’ve had the benefit of Outlander STARZ re-runs of ep201 and ep202, and if you’ve been following them, the re-blogs of my initial (and reaffirmed) reactions to Simon Callow’s work in ep202, here’s the re-blog of my more general review of episodes 201 and 202 as a set.

Upon re-reading the post, I stand by what I said last year. A key point to add: I had promised additional reviews of later episodes that I did not end up delivering. Although fun, intriguing, complex, and generally well acted and produced, season 2 of the Outlander STARZ series does glaringly neglect a faithful development of the fundamental core that is the extraordinary Claire-Jamie bond in the books. (And I’m not talking just about their sexual relationship, which is something many fans have pointed out as being insufficient in season 2.)

My growing disappointment in noticing this diminished spirit of the saga over the course of several episodes led to my choice not to risk dwelling too much on the negatives or unfairly discounting the positives of the show. So that’s why my reviews dropped off.

That said, I eventually (mostly) adjusted to this larger shift and found plenty to love in the 2nd series, and I think most show and book fans did as well. The ensemble acting, Murtagh’s continued character development and greater centrality than in the books, the Battle of Prestonpans, the use of WWII flashbacks for Claire in “Je Suis Prest” (a great episode), and Rosie Day’s delightfully funny portrayal of Mary Hawkins are just a few of the many treasures to uncover. Then there’s Caitriona Balfe’s performance in ep207 . . . nothing short of phenomenal.

Keep watching Outlander, season 2, Fridays, 9pm EST, on STARZ. But I definitely recommend reading the books, too. 😉

Even better news from Diana Gabaldon (the best source) recently indicated that S3 will be very faithful to the books.

Here’s my celebration of what’s to love and grieve about S2’s first two episodes.

Philosofishal

Highlights of Episodes 201 and 202

Spoilers imminent (but we’re mid-season, so it’s time to catch up anyway)

Sparkling Overall Performances:

  1. Caitriona Balfe as Claire
  2. Tobias Menzies as Frank
  3. Duncan LaCroix as Murtagh
  4. Andrew Gower as Bonnie Prince Charlie–quite the caricature
  5. (as always) Simon Callow as the Duke of Sandringham

Sparkling Moments of Performance:

  1. Sam Heughan as Jamie battling the Black Jack Randall demon in ep202
  2. Lionel Lingelser as Louis XV in ep202–so funny!

Delightful New Characters:

  1. Jared Fraser, Jamie’s cousin and a wine merchant, resident of Paris
  2. Prince Charles Stuart, presumptive heir to the British throne
  3. Louise de Rohan, Claire’s new friend and a marquess
  4. Mary Hawkins, Louise’s charge and teenager engaged to Le Vicomte Marigny
  5. Fergus, a young French pickpocket at first named Claudel, whom Jamie employs to steal letters to and from Prince Charles
  6. Suzette, Claire’s lady’s maid, an expanded role thanks to Murtagh’s expanded . …

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Review: Sandringham in Outlander STARZ – Beyond Adaptation

As promised, here’s the re-blog of my in-depth review of Simon Callow’s performance as the Duke of Sandringham, focusing on the final scene of the Outlander STARZ episode that just re-aired at 9pm EST, ep202, “Not in Scotland Anymore.” Prepare for the ultimate unpacking! (No, really.)

This extended review of his work in that one ep202 scene—a thorough indulgence in villainous juices—precedes my review of eps 201 and 202 overall.

These few posts first accompanied Season 2’s U.S. premier in spring 2016.

Stay tuned for the next re-blog or find the post on my site: “Outlander STARZ: Season 2 Review, Eps 201 and 202.”

Philosofishal

Previewed in my post Five-Phrase Friday (37): No “Callow” Craft, this review takes an in-depth look at the final scene of Episode 202, “Not in Scotland Anymore,” in the second series of Outlander STARZ, based on Diana Gabaldon’s second Outlander book Dragonfly in Amber. It is an episode that manages to capture practically everything our heroes grapple with for the rest of the first half of the season. Spoilers imminent.

Paris, 1744. Escape, recovery, new purpose, new digs. Specters of a horrid past in Scotland and its bloody future. Mysticism and superstition in France as in the Scottish Highlands. Duels and fighting practiced, threatened, and restrained. War and religion married in royal ambition. Wine and money mixing with political lies and secret agendas.

Sex, sex, and more sex in anticipation, pursuit, dark corners, and gossip. The irony of an extremely sexy early marriage in Scotland for Claire and…

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Five-Phrase Friday (36): Comic Relief in Outlander STARZ Ep201

If you were as thoroughly depressed as I was by the Outlander STARZ re-run of ep201 last Friday, here’s a recap of the happier parts.

Philosofishal

I’m working up to a Season 2 multi-episode review of the Outlander STARZ TV show, probably covering episodes 201-205. Until then, a dollop of some of my initial thoughts.

Outlander STARZ Season 2 premiere, you know . . . that gut-wrenchingly sad one? Well, it still managed to bring me some much-needed comic relief towards the end.

Here are my choices for the top five (out of a grand total of maybe 7?) laughs in episode 201, the funniest moments that actually elicited laughter.

Laughs in Ep201– from the 45-minute mark transition forward, all in the 1700s setting:

Laugh #1 – Murtagh’s “frogs” comment (Thank God for Murtagh!) when the Frasers land at Le Havre, France

Outlander_S2_gif210_Frogs.giflater in Paris:

Although the line featured in the next gif is funny, I didn’t laugh out loud until Jared replied. . . .

Outlander_S2_gif213_winebiz.gifLaugh #2 – . . . when Jared convinces…

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