Scots: Living Language, Not Bygone Dialect

Five-Phrase Friday (33): Good Breeding

I’m missing my dog these days, now that the weather is warming and I can’t take her for a walk. I still like the Brittany breed, so we may try to get another when we decide to add a dog to the family again.

Mutts are just great in their blended gene health and unique blend of features. But for this post, I’m focusing on traits of a type, so I’ve selected my top five picks for ideal dog breed.

My choices are based on overall package–appearance (cute, elegant, leggy), intelligence (smart but not too smart), affection level (almost too affectionate is good), trainability (must be trainable), size (medium to medium-large), energy level (medium), character (unique, charismatic), maintenance level (low to medium–hair mainly), overall health trends (few or manageable genetic issues), and expense/availability from a breeder or rescue (why go halfway across the country when there are good dogs in need back home?).

See my previous post on dog shows and breed aesthetics.


Top Choices of Dog Breeds (includes mixes with one or more of these in them):

  1. Brittany
  2. Welsh Springer Spaniel or English Springer Spaniel
  3. Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever: similar to Brittany’s structure but more rare
  4. German Short-Haired Pointer
  5. Black and Tan Coonhound

Honorable mentions include:

Samoyed – great but just not in the top 5; maybe a bit too small

VizslaThumb

Image credit AKC website, Vizsla breed profile page

Vizsla – gorgeous and sweet; just a little too energetic, less commonly available

Flat-coated retriever – also less common and only found in black-colored coat

Belgian Tervuren or Belgian Malinois – like a German Shepherd in appearance; working dogs, equally energetic

Labrador retriever – a bit too stocky and shed too much; kinda boring (too common)

Kuvasz – too rare

Golden retriever – plentiful; I just don’t like them as much, even the pretty coat

Shetland sheepdog – perhaps a bit too small and feisty

Siberian husky – too energetic, too work driven for our lifestyle

Maltese – too small and fast (gotta be able to wrangle it!)


These would all be lovely pure breeds to have, but that doesn’t mean we’re averse to a good fit from a shelter. My husband’s list would probably include Pembroke Welsh Corgis and Dachshunds (he likes sausage-shaped dogs he can laugh at when they run), and if I were willing to go for smaller dogs, my choices would be more like West Highland White Terrier or Miniature Schnauzer.

Check out the side-by-side comparison tool at the AKC website. Pretty handy.

Really, though, at this point, I still just want my dog back. . . .

Five-Phrase Friday (30): British Invasion

Now that St. Patrick’s Day is over, and you’re ready for some post-hangover learning, bring on the Brits!

Relations between Great Britain (UK) and the United States have been described as being between “two societies separated by a common language,” implying the difficulties we have in understanding each other when using the same words (homonyms) that have different meanings on either side of the pond.

Even agreement over the word “English” can be a tricky proposition. There’s American English (we’ll set aside its diversity for now), British English, Irish English, Scots English, Welsh English, and many more in between. It is debatable, I suppose, to call Geordie a form of British English, but references call it a dialect. Whichever “dialect,” or version, you consider to be true “English English” or “proper English” may inevitably depend upon which one you speak.

One way or another, though, as I said in post 28, ultimately it comes down to communication and common understanding. If we are to bring an attitude of respect to each other’s lands, then efforts toward this common understanding are paramount.

As an American, Briticisms you might come across while preparing for a UK vacay, especially in London or other large cities, include:

  1. bespoke apparel (adj.) = custom-made clothes. This term frequently describes famed or historic high-end tailoring houses, department stores, and royal shops in London, England. For Americans, it seems to be simply a quaint, archaic adjective, if not utterly foreign. British fictional characters might use it, but surely not real people.
  2. an arcade (n.) = a shopping mall or plaza. It gets its name from the use of arches in the architecture of the building. Our most familiar use of this term in the States refers to the video game arcades of decades past. Example: Burlington Arcade in London.
  3. a circus (n.) = a rounded open space in a town or city where several streets converge; a prime example: Piccadilly Circus. After all, it would be inaccurate to call it a square. The USA simply doesn’t have as many circular public spaces as the Old World does. (Brits have the other type of circus for entertainment as well.) Source: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/circus
  4. a parade (n.) = a public promenade, square or street of shops. Example: Horse Guards Parade, ” large parade ground off Whitehall in central London, England. . . . It is the site of the annual ceremonies of Trooping the Colour, which commemorates the monarch’s official birthday.” Again, another meaning is the event or activity of parading. Football (soccer) stadiums in England might also be named as some proprietor’s parade. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse_Guards_Parade
  5. a hamper-style meal (n.) = In the UK, a hamper is “a basket or box containing food for a special occasion.” Although Americans might expect food to come out of the laundry, a hamper-style meal in Britain is similar to the American picnic basket or boxed lunch. A portable repast. Source: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/hamper

COVERLONDONGUIDEPRINT

I drew my inspiration from the writing style and examples in the special-issue magazine London 2016 Guide, published by The Chelsea Magazine Company Ltd and sponsored by Britain Magazine.

The guide is a useful collection of up-to-the-moment tips and insights for tourists of England’s capital this year. The art is high quality and enticing, and its advertisements reveal hidden treasures and specialized interests that may not have made the top lists featured in “Capital Views” or “101 Days Out,” which presents site lists based on theme. I particularly appreciated the “Literature Lovers” section on page 80 of that article. I’ve been enjoying my perusal of the guide as my husband and I plan our UK jaunt.

If you’ve been reading my other posts, you’ll know I’m a huge fan of the Outlander books and TV series, which is one of the major sparks for our planning this trip–Scotland. However, I figured, lest I get carried away booking Scottish stops, as an English teacher, I had better remember and learn more about the many reasons for visiting England. As I’ve been doing that, I’m wishing we only had more time to cover it all. It’s looking as though we’ll have to skip Ireland (sorry St. Paddy! and Mom) and Wales altogether for this, our first-ever trip to the United Kingdom.

By the way, if you missed all the fun with puns, see last week’s post or the small-town slogans in Five-Phrase Friday (7).